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Thread: Chemicals Help

  1. #11

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    Yes, if you want 1500ml of working strength solution, you’d mix 100ml of concentrate + 1400ml of water.

    If you want 1000ml of working strength solution you’d mix

    1000ml/15 = 66.7ml of concentrate + 933.3ml of water to get 1000ml of solution at 1:14.

  2. #12
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisphotos123 View Post
    so does it mean if it says 1+14 is that 100ml chemical and 1400ml water
    That would be correct.

    If the instructions say "A + B", you take A-parts of stock solution and mix it with B-parts of clean water. You will end up with A+B amount of working solution at the end.

    It doesn't really matter what the units of measure are as long as you are consistent throughout. You could use milliliters, ounces or drams. You could even use Dixie cups if you wanted to be so silly. Just be sure that you use the same units of measure for everything and be sure to measure as accurately as you know how.

    In your example, you use 1 unit of stock and 14 unit of water to end up with 15 units of working solution: 100 ml. of chemical gets added to 1,400 ml. of water and you will end up with 1,500 ml (1.5 liters) of ready-to-use solution.

    If you want to measure in ounces, you would add 1 oz. of stock to 14 oz. of water to get 15 oz. of working solution.

    You can run the calculations backward, too. If you need a certain amount of working solution, you can calculate how much stock and how much water you need to make it. Just add the two numbers together and divide.

    If you need 1.5 liters of working solution (1,500 ml.) and you know that your recipe calls for "1 + 14", add those numbers together to get 15 then divide that into 1,500 ml. The answer is 100 ml. Therefore, you need 100 ml. of stock. Subtract that from the total amount of solution and you calculate the amount of water needed. (1,500 - 100 = 1,400)

    Double check your math. Does 100 + 1,400 = 1,500? Does that match with the numbers called for in the recipe? Yup! You're good to go.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #13
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    Tips from a relative newbie.

    Film developer - mix up what you need (prob 300ml in total for 1 x 35mm film and 500ml for 1 x 120 film, if using standard tanks). use it once and throw it away as you empty the tank. This is "one-shot" and is the way most film developer is used. On the fact sheets for ilford developer they give the quantities for mixing different amounts. For example I use LC29 @ 1:19, which from the ilford chart for 300ml is 15ml of fixer and 285ml of water. (15ml X 1 = 15, 15ml x 19 = 285, so the mix is 1:19 or 1+19 depending how you write it - it means the same) Stop and fixer can be re-used for quite a long time - read up on capacity. I have labels on my bottles and just check off each film and paper I develop with each mix. If you clip the ends off your films before loading the reels, you can use the ends to check your fixer is still working - they go clear. test in new fixer and time, then re-time in old fixer. When the old fixer takes twice as long to clear the film clip as new fixer, throw it away and start again. Paper developer will last about a week mixed up and can be reused (certainly for a newbie). OK you might see a little degradation in quality with paper developer that is getting old. I bought a dozen 500ml plastic bottles from ebay and use these to make up 500ml quantities of stock solution - stop, paper developer, fixer. I use all my fixer at 1:4 and use the same mix for both film and paper. maybe others don't agree with this but it seems to work OK. 500ml is a good quantity to make up as it fills a standard 8x10 tray deep enough to use.

    Honestly, the ilford website has all the info you need. If you need any help with the maths, or interpreting the graphs for e.g. time/temperature adjustment just ask.

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    1+9 means 1 part of stocksolutionplus 9 parts of water.others often call this 1:9, but i find the ilford way of calling this out maes more sense, at least to me.just takw 100ml of your freshly mixed chemical(stock solution)and add 900ml of waterto make 1 liter of working solutionjust as rgould said above
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    bingo.you've got it!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #16

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    i am using Ilford Rapid Fixer

    Ilford Ilfostop

    Ilford Multigrade Paper Developer


    I was wondering once mixed up ready for using What ones can i keep mixed up in a bottle ready for nextime just needing warlming up

  7. #17

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    You can use STOP BATH until they are exhausted although most people don't. I do. I just pour it back into my working storage container and use it few times. Just a lazy practice of mine. Works fine and don't want to mix it every time.

    Paper developers are mixed into stock solution and diluted just before use, called working solution. Once diluted like this, they do not last long. In tray, typically lasts 24 hours. If you cover it with saran wrap, wrap making contact with the liquid, not tight over the lip of tray, they last for few days. They do weaken daily though. Once mixed, they are considered one session use only.

    I really suggest you'd download instructions and tech notes from Ilford and read it from cover to cover. Everything you asked are covered in pains taking detail in each of them. That way, you know what's right straight from the manufacturer.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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