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  1. #11

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    According to Kodak the shelf life of the Dektol stock solution is 6 months in fully filled bottles.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Gerald, Kodak or rather Champion manufacture and then Kodak sell Liquid Dektol it's a PQ version of D72 with Dimezone. It's been available for quite a few years but in some markets it's been called Polymax developer.

    It'll keep quite well in a deep tank with a floating lid as long as it gets topped up on a bleed system, possibly months.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 09-22-2012 at 05:45 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  3. #13

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    Some sources do refer to Polymax as liquid Dektol but the two formulas are different enough that its hard to consider Polymax as Dektol. In the case of the OP he was confused by a photo of the 5 l Dektol package that looked like it contained liquid.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14

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    I have Dektol that I mixed on September 4th, 2005, that is still active. See thread Bizarre logevity of my last batch of Dektol. It was stored in half filled gallon glass bottles with Beseler XDL spray and a tight lid, in the dark, undisturbed under my sink for years. I recently dug it out and tested it, and it is fine. I'm still quite amazed, and somewhat in disbelief. YMMV.

  5. #15
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    I use Polymax T as my print developer of choice. As I understand it, it is branded as "Liquid Dektol" in much of the world because it's performance is similar to standard Dektol.

    It is sold in both 32 oz bottles and larger cubitainers. I would be surprised if it would behave well in a floating lid container. I believe that it is designed to be more convenient for one-shot use than powdered Dektol.

    In case you haven't seen it: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...Pubs/j5/j5.pdf is the Kodak publication for it.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16

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    Matt,
    I used Polymax T at a lab I worked at for 14 years. I believe it was designed for roller transport machines and has an additive to to help not oxidize so quickly. I've been told to additive is nasty stuff and to use gloves when working with it. Not sure if this is 100% true so if anyone here knows please chime in. As far as comparing it to Dektol I have not noticed any difference in the prints I have done using both developers.

    Rich

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allsystemsfail View Post
    Matt,
    I used Polymax T at a lab I worked at for 14 years. I believe it was designed for roller transport machines and has an additive to to help not oxidize so quickly. I've been told to additive is nasty stuff and to use gloves when working with it. Not sure if this is 100% true so if anyone here knows please chime in. As far as comparing it to Dektol I have not noticed any difference in the prints I have done using both developers.

    Rich
    Rich:

    I would assume roller transport use would also imply regular/continuous replenishment. If you intend doing that, my reservations are hereby withdrawn .

    As far as toxicity is concerned, I have no definitive information on the issue, but do have some observations:

    1) I have been using it for years without gloves, but usually with tongs or tubes. So far, no problems whatsoever. I am not, however, a heavy user; and
    2) None of the Kodak information I have seen about the developer (which is almost all the information available) includes any special or unusual safety warnings. I would expect to see warnings of that type if Polymax was more toxic than something like Dektol when mixed to working strength; and
    3) I would assume that any issues of toxicity would be more serious for the undiluted concentrate than the working solution. I'm therefore slightly more carefully careful when handling the concentrate than when I am actually printing with the working solution, however that is easy to do.

    Hope this helps.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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