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  1. #1
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    Old continuous tone graphical art films.

    I am very excited to get 20 boxes of well expired (30+ years) but mostly unopened 4x5 films.
    The bundle includes normal films like Royal Pan, Plus-X, Tri-X and FP4, which will be fun to shoot with.

    Also there are kodalith graphical art and copy films that I am not familiar with.
    I searched the web and found good info on kodalith ortho type 3 (2556), which is half tone super contrasty film for line arts.
    I also have commercial ortho (6645), kodalith pan (2568) and blue sensitive (4127) which, I understand, are all continuous tone films.
    Any info on these? Web search found very little info on these.
    I mainly want to know about this 'continuous tone' graphical art, commercial and copy films.
    Are they similar to Tech Pan? - in terms of tones and usability as in-camera film.
    Thanks
    es

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    I looked in Kodak Pamphlet Q-2, dated January 1971. Kodalith Pan 2568 is an extreme contrast film, the panchromatic equivalent of Kodalith Ortho Type 3. Kodak Commercial Film 4127 is a blue sensitive projection speed material with moderately high contrast, kind of like enlarging paper. For camera work, the tungsten speed is listed as 8 and the white flame arc speed (possibly close to daylight) is 20. Development time for gravure work is listed as 3 minutes in HC-110 dilution C. Kodak Commercial Ortho film was more or less the orthochromatic version of Kodak Commercial film. It was designed to make continuous tone negatives for the gravure process, and it had moderately high contrast. Other than that, I can't find much about it. Most of these films had fine grain, but they were not like Tech Pan in any way.

  3. #3
    eSPhotos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I looked in Kodak Pamphlet Q-2, dated January 1971. Kodalith Pan 2568 is an extreme contrast film, the panchromatic equivalent of Kodalith Ortho Type 3. Kodak Commercial Film 4127 is a blue sensitive projection speed material with moderately high contrast, kind of like enlarging paper. For camera work, the tungsten speed is listed as 8 and the white flame arc speed (possibly close to daylight) is 20. Development time for gravure work is listed as 3 minutes in HC-110 dilution C. Kodak Commercial Ortho film was more or less the orthochromatic version of Kodak Commercial film. It was designed to make continuous tone negatives for the gravure process, and it had moderately high contrast. Other than that, I can't find much about it. Most of these films had fine grain, but they were not like Tech Pan in any way.
    Thanks heaps. That's more than what i can get from the web.
    I have had exposed these films at EI16 and developed in Rodinal 1+200 for 12 minutes.
    Except Kodalith Ortho Type 3, all came out with some mid tone.
    May be I need more testing ...



 

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