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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnielvis View Post
    no way you're going to get iso 50 or even 25....forget that...that's what film emulsions are for

    PE just sticks ilford paper in his film holder, exposes it at iso 25 every time he uses it,
    and illumiquest rated ilford paper at iso 25 in his afghan box camera when he took it on the street
    without any special technique of increasing the speed. ( you can see his results in his apug gallery )

    15 years ago i tested the speed of every paper i had in my darkroom, 15+ varieties of
    rc and fb papers ( graded + rc ). i exposed and tested them all in the same conditions and they varied wildly
    from less than asa 1 to around 12 ... i tended to look for a dense negative rather than a good one
    because i never really shot paper negatives, and was clueless when i did the test ... probably my tests
    would have rated my ilford at asa 25 too ... but i didn't know any better

    nothing special, just a skylight, a coffee cup a camera and some paper
    and a tray full of gaf universal developer ( sister of ansco 130 )

  2. #12

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    I used an EI of 6 with MGIV in a pinhole camera, but there were so many other variables that I never nailed down an exact figure.

    Perhaps it would also be helpful to know what you are trying to achieve, then maybe some sort of workaround can be collectively arrived at?!

  3. #13

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    Thanks everyone for your inputs. I'm trying to work out a way to take large format indoor portraits with passive lighting and then probably contact print them.
    I want to avoid a lighting set up, so no flashes. I like the look of photo paper, so hoping to use that (5x7).
    My problem is getting the models to hold still. I'm hoping to solve the problem be increasing the sensitivity of the paper (through developer) or use a faster speed paper.
    jnanian mentioned a 100 ISO emulsion called "luminos" - I'll look into that.
    My own experiance with Ilford paper is that it is about ISO 5, but maybe better development will get me to PE and jnanian's ISO 25.
    I'm still working on this and will report back my status!

  4. #14
    semeuse's Avatar
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    I have used paper negatives for indoor portraits with an 8x10 Ansco camera fitted with a somewhat fast homemade lens (about f6 or so). I'd guess the ISO somewhere around 6 or 10 - single weight Slavich paper. No flash, but TONS of light to be able to use my cap as the shutter - I seem to remember something like 2 250 watt and 1 500 watt hot lights fairly close to the subject in a bright room. What did I do with those prints? They're in one of those boxes in there...

  5. #15
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    If you're looking for an orthochromatic look, try xray film. I've heard that it's about ASA 100-200. I bought some to test, but haven't gotten around to testing yet. It's also dirt cheap and you can process it like BW photo paper under a safelight.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkillmer View Post
    jnanian mentioned a 100 ISO emulsion called "luminos" - I'll look into that.
    sorry to report this
    but it hasn't been made in a long long time ...

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    If you're looking for an orthochromatic look, try xray film. I've heard that it's about ASA 100-200. I bought some to test, but haven't gotten around to testing yet. It's also dirt cheap and you can process it like BW photo paper under a safelight.
    Pulling up an older thread, as I have begun to jump into 8x10. I don't have the funding to buy new film, so will be shooting with paper negatives for a while. But about this X-Ray film Maincoon--I thought I had studied the matter and made the determination that X-Ray film was blue-sensitive, and paper was mildly orthochromatic. But I've done so much of this internet research, I can't figure what's what any more. More discussion on the matter would be welcome.

  8. #18
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I managed to shoot and process some Fuji HRT. I rate it at ASA 200 souped in Dektol. It's green sensitive. It's about $45 for 100 sheets 8x10. I've been making salt prints with the negs.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #19

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    OK, green, which qualifies it as ortho, though I might question whether it has flat response across that end of the spectrum. But possibly, enough to at least be able to use a yellow filter and get some cloud contrast (separation), maybe? I hate the idea of shooting a blue sky with big puffy clouds and getting nothing but a zone 9 out of it all.
    Now, on to paper, it's obvious all I'm going to be able to buy new would be some brand of RC multigrade for the making of paper negatives. I wonder just how ortho it is, if at all.

  10. #20
    Nikola Dulgiarov's Avatar
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    Ortho X-ray film can be exposed through a medium yellow filter with good results, neat cloud separation and tonal range of the skin tones. I've been working solely with mammography x-ray film for my 8x10 images, and I shoot it at 100ASA, filter included, and develop in Pyrocat HD, Xtol. The Perfection XR foruma on unblinkingeye allows for a push up to 200 ASA. If you absolutely have to use paper negatives, color RA4 paper developed in a high contrast B&W developer is easily 100 ASA and is panchromatic. I haven't tried it in Pyrocat @ 1+5+100, but it may be worthwhile.

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