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  1. #11
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I was there too.. but dark ages , really Ron .
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I remember my first college photo class. The lab had a huge ferrotyping print dryer. If you wanted glossy, you put them face up. Put them face down for matt. Not too many of those machines survived. The smell I remembered was like ironing clothes from the canvas belt that wrapped around that polished chrome drum.

  2. #12
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Just to one up ya, our was coal fired
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    what is fire? we used falling water.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Just to one up ya, our was coal fired

  4. #14

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    I've read that heat-drying prints can alter the image color - going cooler in tone for example. I've never tried it myself.

  5. #15
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    I normally hang them to dry but on occasion (such as in workshops) I need to dry them quickly, so if the only concern is curling, dust and colour change, then thats fine, thanks all.
    www.thephotoshop.ie
    www.monochromemeath.com

    "you get your mouth off of my finger" Les McLean

  6. #16
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I was there too.. but dark ages , really Ron .
    All analog photography was carried out in the dark. Thus "the dark ages" appellation used to describe those days!

    ALL production prints were dried with heat. Oh, and developed and printed in the dark!

    PE

  7. #17

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    I have a little toaster oven just outside the darkroom and use it for judging drydown effect on fiber
    based test strips. It works great as long as the timer is set for only about 20 sec - otherwise, all
    prints look the same - charcoal black, once the smoke clears! For color C prints I use a heat gun
    at a very low setting, much like a hair dryer. All keeper prints are air dried on fiberglass screens.
    In the dark ages, as you call them, my brother would ferrotype dye transfer prints, and wow did they
    look nice. I was into Cibachromes and one didn't dare do anything to them - just let em dry on their
    own and judged them the next day.

  8. #18

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    I often blow dry my (glossy) FB prints. I use a darkroom at the photoclub and don't want to leave my prints there to dry. So if I have only produced one or two FB prints that I want to bring home, I pull out the blow dryer. I put the print face up on some paper towel and set the blow dryer to high. The thing I'm using is a cheap 1200W dryer with just a high/off/low setting. I keep moving the dryer constantly over the print at a 30.. 50 cm distance (guess). When the print starts to curl up, I flip it over face down and blow dry the back. The paper now initially flattens and then curls up again. By flipping it over and back during the blow drying I get a print that is dry enough to transport home in the box and is actually flatter then when air dried laying face up on a screen. I haven't seen any detrimental side effects due to the blow drying. No extra dust or paper towel fiber glued into the surface.
    Last edited by spijker; 09-28-2012 at 02:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    At Tim Rudman's workshops we wiped down the prints with paper towels before blow-drying them front and back (as spijker, although I tend to just hold the print in hand). Works great, dries much flatter than air-dried, and is good for checking dry-down and test prints. That being said, I still let my final prints dry the old-fashioned way.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Home heated dryers were available at most all photo stores.
    I have one down in my basement that I used with FB paper for years. It will dry up to 11x14 prints.

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