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  1. #21
    Maine-iac's Avatar
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    Divided Development source

    I first encountered this notion of divided developers in a compilation of old Dignan Photographic newsletters, published in 1972 by Patrick Dignan, Paul Farber, and others. They spoke of it as a much older technique that was not well-known, but very effective. I found it liberating and have used it ever since, primarily, however for paper developing rather than film. Both work equally well, but for my purposes, it's the printing part where it has been most useful to me.

    Larry

  2. #22
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    In my search for long-lasting tray life in my darkroom and trimming my setup time as much as possible, this seems like an ideal solution. I've got some formulary 130 developer on order, and if I like it, I'm going to start mixing my own Ansco 130 and I'd like to use it divided.

    From a previous thread, I've got this recipe:
    [...]
    (recipe deleted to prevent angst to future searchers. Apparently,
    it wasn't Ansco 130. (: )
    [...]

    So to divide it, I have a solution in tray A with the ---, ---, ---, and ---, and tray B is loaded with ---. How do I divide the water in the recipe between the two trays?

    Can't wait to get started... (:

    -KwM-
    Last edited by kwmullet; 12-26-2004 at 05:15 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Recipe I got from a thread is NOT Ansco 130, so I deleted it.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet
    In my search for long-lasting tray life in my darkroom and trimming my setup time as much as possible, this seems like an ideal solution. I've got some formulary 130 developer on order, and if I like it, I'm going to start mixing my own Ansco 130 and I'd like to use it divided.

    From a previous thread, I've got this recipe:
    Water 750 ml
    Metol 3.0 grams
    Sulfite 44.0 grams
    Hydroquinone 12.0 grams
    Sodium Carbonate 65.0 grams
    Potassium Bromide 2.0 grams
    Water to 1 liter for a stock used 1:2-1:4 for paper.

    So to divide it, I have a solution in tray A with the metol, sulfite, hydroquinone, and potassium bromide, and tray B is loaded with Potassium bromide. How do I divide the water in the recipe between the two trays?

    Can't wait to get started... (:

    -KwM-
    The recipe you listed is not Ansco 130. The proportions are not correct and the Glycin (argueably the most important ingredient) is missing.

    Also, you have a typo. The "B" bath should contain the alkali - in this case Sodium Carbonate - not Potassium Bromide.

    To split this developer, mix everything but the Sodium Carbonate into sufficient water to make a total solution volume of 1 liter. This is the "A" bath.

    The "B" bath contains all the carbonate and sufficient water to make a total solution volume of 1 liter.


    --------------------------------------

    I posted the recipe for Ansco 130 in the APUG Chemistry Recipes section:

    Ansco (Ansco/American Agfa) 130 Paper Developer

    Water (125 F or 52C)-----------------------------750 ml
    Metol*-------------------------------------------2.2 grams
    Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)------------------------50 grams
    Hydroquinone-------------------------------------11 grams
    Sodium Carbonate (monohydrated)-----------------78 grams
    Potassium Bromide---------------------------------5.5 grams
    Glycin---------------------------------------------11 grams
    Water to make-------------------------------------1.0 liter

    *Dissolve a pinch of sodium sulfite first, then dissolve the Metol.

    Dissolve the other chemicals in the order listed.

    Published in: Darkroom Handbook and Formulary (copyright 1940) by Morris Germain, A.R.P.S.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet
    In my search for long-lasting tray life in my darkroom and trimming my setup time as much as possible, this seems like an ideal solution. I've got some formulary 130 developer on order, and if I like it, I'm going to start mixing my own Ansco 130 and I'd like to use it divided.

    From a previous thread, I've got this recipe:
    Water 750 ml
    Metol 3.0 grams
    Sulfite 44.0 grams
    Hydroquinone 12.0 grams
    Sodium Carbonate 65.0 grams
    Potassium Bromide 2.0 grams
    Water to 1 liter for a stock used 1:2-1:4 for paper.

    -KwM-
    The recipe you listed above is for Ansco 125 (aka American Agfa 125 or GAF 125), not for Ansco 130.

    This developer is very similar to Kodak D72 (and Dektol).
    Tom Hoskinson
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  5. #25
    kwmullet's Avatar
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    Thanks very much guys for setting me straight. I got the wrong impression from a previous Ansco130 thread. I deleted the erroneous recipe from my post... maybe y'all could do likewise from your quote of my post so no one gets confused in the future if they do a search and just get that post as a hit.

    I've seen mention a couple of times in the forum of a table that gives kitchen/informal equivalents of formal measurements, like how many grams is a teaspoon, a tablespoon, etc. I think some posters have mentioned that they were able to get along without buying a balance by doing things this way.

    Pointers to such a table? Comments on the method?

    -KwM-
    Last edited by kwmullet; 12-26-2004 at 06:26 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwmullet
    Thanks very much guys for setting my straight. I got the wrong impression from a previous Ansco130 thread. I deleted the erroneous recipe from my post... maybe y'all could do likewise from your quote of my post so no one gets confused in the future if they do a search and just get that post as a hit.

    I've seen mention a couple of times in the forum of a table that gives kitchen/informal equivalents of formal measurements, like how many grams is a teaspoon, a tablespoon, etc. I think some posters have mentioned that they were able to get along without buying a balance by doing things this way.

    Pointers to such a table? Comments on the method?

    -KwM-
    You are welcome!

    Try this web based general purpose grams-to-teaspoons calculator. It should be close enough for most photo chemical recipes:

    http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/gram_calc.htm

    Where more accurate measurement is required you might consider one of the small battery powered electronic scales that are available for about $30.00 on eBay.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maine-iac
    Jay,

    Nope, I mean 10 ml of Edwal's liquid Orthazite, which is Benzotriazole, but I'm not sure in what percentage solution. I should have specified that.

    Larry
    I'm not sure where I know this from (maybe Anchell's _Darkroom Cookbook_), but I believe Liquid Orthazite is a 3% solution of benzotriazole with sodium sulfite added.

    Anchell also has teaspoon conversions, and suggests that particularly with powdered chemicals that absorb water from the air, measurements by volume can be more accurate than by weight.
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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I'm not sure where I know this from (maybe Anchell's _Darkroom Cookbook_), but I believe Liquid Orthazite is a 3% solution of benzotriazole with sodium sulfite added.

    Anchell also has teaspoon conversions, and suggests that particularly with powdered chemicals that absorb water from the air, measurements by volume can be more accurate than by weight.

    A 3% solution of Benzotriazole is a very high concentration. It might be difficult to dissolve (and keep dissolved) in water at that concentration.

    I use a .2% solution of Benzotriazole in water as a stock concentrate.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #29
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It is a high concentration, but I'm not sure if Liquid Orthazite entirely water based.

    I keep a 1% concentration on hand, and lately a 0.1 % concentration.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  10. #30
    Maine-iac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    A 3% solution of Benzotriazole is a very high concentration. It might be difficult to dissolve (and keep dissolved) in water at that concentration.

    I use a .2% solution of Benzotriazole in water as a stock concentrate.
    I don't know what concentration liquid Orthazite really is, but I've never had any problems with it. 10 ml in all my developer formulas seems to work just fine.

    Larry

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