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  1. #1

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    Does 35mm have higher base + fog than 120 ?

    I primarily shoot medium format. Tmax 100, Tmax 400, HP5 and Panf 50.
    I had a bulk roll of 35 mm PanF Plus, a Nikon F100 with a 35 to 70 2.8 Nikon lens and decided to shoot it up.
    I developed a couple of rolls in Xtol and thought the base + fog to be high. Thinking that maybe my bulk roll
    was aged I bought another. Same issue. Shot a roll of 35mm FP125, same issue. Shot a roll of HP5, same issue.
    Delta 100 same issue, base + fog is high.

    To rule out the camera and lens I pulled a couple of feet off of the bulk roll of PanF in the dark, loaded a reel and developed same in Xtol.
    My densitometer gave me a reading of 0.36.

    I developed a roll of HP5, Tmax 100 and Delta 100 in Xtol, base + fog for all 0.08 to 0.1.

    Does 35mm have a higher base + fog than 120 ?

  2. #2
    erikg's Avatar
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    Does 35mm have higher base + fog than 120 ?

    Yes, generally speaking it does.

  3. #3

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    I guess I did'nt get the memo.

    So, does 35mm have a lower contrast than 120 ?

  4. #4
    jp498's Avatar
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    I think it may have more so as to attenuate light passing through the film's plastic lengthwise, such as from the leader, inward. 120 is usually wrapped in black paper from end to end, and LF is only one sheet at a time always in the dark.

  5. #5

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    What you are seeing is the antihalation dye in the 35mm base.
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 09-30-2012 at 09:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by bascom49 View Post
    I primarily shoot medium format. Tmax 100, Tmax 400, HP5 and Panf 50.
    I had a bulk roll of 35 mm PanF Plus, a Nikon F100 with a 35 to 70 2.8 Nikon lens and decided to shoot it up.
    I developed a couple of rolls in Xtol and thought the base + fog to be high. Thinking that maybe my bulk roll
    was aged I bought another. Same issue. Shot a roll of 35mm FP125, same issue. Shot a roll of HP5, same issue.
    Delta 100 same issue, base + fog is high.

    To rule out the camera and lens I pulled a couple of feet off of the bulk roll of PanF in the dark, loaded a reel and developed same in Xtol.
    My densitometer gave me a reading of 0.36.

    I developed a roll of HP5, Tmax 100 and Delta 100 in Xtol, base + fog for all 0.08 to 0.1.

    Does 35mm have a higher base + fog than 120 ?
    Hardly a definitive test since you mention nothing about the age and storage conditions of the films. What is needed is rigorous testing under lab conditions using sound statisitical methods. At a very minimum you must test 3 samples of each film under exactly the same confitions.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 09-30-2012 at 11:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by erikg View Post
    Yes, generally speaking it does.
    On what do you base this statement?
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #8

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    Light piping is really not a problem with the acetate base used in still films. Even if light piping were present it would only effect the first few frames of a 35 mm roll.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 09-30-2012 at 10:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bascom49 View Post

    Does 35mm have a higher base + fog than 120 ?
    Yours does.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    What you are seeing is the antihalation dye in the 35mm base.
    someone on another forum asked why their film was purple and I said the same thing -- it's the dye. Let your 35mm film rinse for an hour, or even just let it sit in still water for an hour after rinsing for 10 in running water.

    You will be amazed how much purple runs out with that final rinse, and how much clearer the base is.

    if this were light piping it would be on the first couple of inches and nowhere else, and that is something I've never seen and I always leave the leader of my film out after I rewind.

    ctrentelman

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