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  1. #11
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Not necessarily. The question you need to ask yourself is: Will my pictures be any more important because I switch to FP4+?
    I think we get lost in technical aspects that, in the end, mean very little in the grand scheme of things.
    Very true Thomas. It's so easy to get caught up in the technicals instead of spending time shooting. I keep trying to tell myself to simplify (not always the easiest thing to do either).



    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    I have also switched from Pyrocat to Jay DeFehr's Obsidian Aqua. It is easier to mix, has fewer ingredients, works faster, and produces, to my eye, equal results.
    Interesting! I'll have to check that out.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  2. #12
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I switched to FP4 as I do not require speed with my work , I think its a great film.
    A couple of my clients who use a lot of film still use HP5 for all their work, I develop in D76 or PMK depending on the lighting of the original scene.

    I believe the issue is more speed as both films are fantastic.... thanks Simon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Bannow View Post
    So, I guess you're all saying that I should keep both films then?

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Dan I have been considering trying Jay's stuff.. how easy is it to mix from scratch and any oddity's with it one needs to watch out...... like PMK oxidizes very quick ,or issues like that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    Jeff: FP4 is my film of choice, mostly because it is slower and presumably finer grained. I've never done a side by side comparison so can't say for sure. Occasionally if I need a faster film, a little smoother, for portraits, I'll reach for HP5.

    I have also switched from Pyrocat to Jay DeFehr's Obsidian Aqua. It is easier to mix, has fewer ingredients, works faster, and produces, to my eye, equal results.

  4. #14
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Bob: The stock A solution is very easy to mix. I make it in a 250ml batch: 175 ml distilled water at 50c, 5 grams sodium metabisulfite and 62.5 grams catechol, then top off to 250 ml.

    You can either mix up a stock B solution of sodium carbonate which is diluted before use, or just dissolve an appropriate amount of sodium carbonate in plain water and add the A solution just before pouring into the tank. That is the option I use. Either way calls for a 6.66% B solution.

    The A solution is used very dilute at 1:500. For my 55oz developing tanks it takes only 3.25 ml of A, diluted in 55 oz plain water into which 10 grams of carbonate has been dissolved.

    You can also use potassium metabisulfite and potassium carbonate instead of sodium.

    There is a big thread started by Jay on the LF forum that gives more complete (and maybe more accurate) information.

    I am developing normally exposed negatives for 12 minutes at 21c with 1 minute initial agitation followed by 10 seconds of agitation at 4 and 8 minutes. Quite a bit faster than Pyrocat.

    I think it does oxidize pretty quickly, but I have no experience with PMK so I don't know how it compares to that. I do know that mixing just before use, and using it one-shot that oxidation is not a problem. I have found no other issues with the developer, and as I wrote to Jeff, to my eye the negatives look equal in sharpness to Pyrocat HD semistand.
    Dan


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've been shooting almost exclusively FP4+ for my large format b/w work. I do have a stash of Tmax400 in whole plate size that I need to go burn through. But FP4+ in Pyrocat HD has been my go-to combination for everything from 120 to 14x17 (although I do wish I had the Tmax400 for the 14x17 to help manage the bellows extension factor). I typically shoot the FP4+ at 64. Beautiful stuff.

  6. #16
    ROL
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    FP4+ is my go–to LF sheet film (5X7). If I need more speed, though practically it is only one stop, I'll use HP5 which is a bit more contrasty and has only slightly larger grain. Both developed in Pyro. Not a fan of Pyrocat. I'm happy to have both in my film holders. For 120, I really have to give FP4+ in Pyro a try, though my current preference is to use slow 25 ISO films in Rodinal.

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I rate FP4 at 50 ISO for use with Pyro and it is wonderful.

    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    FP4+ is my go–to LF sheet film (5X7). If I need more speed, though practically it is only one stop, I'll use HP5 which is a bit more contrasty and has only slightly larger grain. Both developed in Pyro. Not a fan of Pyrocat. I'm happy to have both in my film holders. For 120, I really have to give FP4+ in Pyro a try, though my current preference is to use slow 25 ISO films in Rodinal.

  8. #18
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I have a hard time getting the (high) contrast I need with HP5+, so I go with FP4+ (sheet film and alt processes).
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    I have a hard time getting the (high) contrast I need with HP5+, so I go with FP4+ (sheet film and alt processes).
    So irrespective of how long you develop you don't get enough contrast?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I rate FP4 at 50 ISO for use with Pyro and it is wonderful.
    Thanks, I'll have to try a comparison of FP4+ @ 50 with PanF+ @ 50 (which I'm not terribly enamored of) in 120. I shoot the sheet () @ 100.

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