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  1. #11

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    I just tried to get my lower lip into my developing tank and now I'm writing this from hospital.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    I just tried to get my lower lip into my developing tank and now I'm writing this from hospital.
    Nice one

    pentaxuser

  3. #13
    Mike Bates's Avatar
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    You can develop black and white film at many different temperatures, but you'll make yourself crazy if you don't pick one and stick to it.

    68 degrees F (20 degrees C) is the usual recommendation. Even a cheap thermometer will be reasonably repeatable, even if not particularly accurate. It doesn't cost much to get a reasonably accurate thermometer.

    For most of the year, my tap water is warmer than 68 degrees. No problem. I use standard stainless tanks (better thermal transfer than plastic) with leakproof lids. I use an inexpensive styrofoam minnow bucket to hold the water bath. It's thick styrofoam, so it holds the temperature very well once I get it stabilized.



    I throw a few ice cubes in the water and swirl it around until my thermometer hits 68 degrees. I pull out any remaining ice cubes and put my graduated cylinder full of developer in the water to acclimate. After I load the film into the tank, I float the tank in there too.

    When I'm ready to go, I pour the developer into the tank, give it a few inversions, and drop it into the water bath. Now it sinks to the bottom. Every 30 seconds, I lift it out, give it two inversions, and back into the bucket of water it goes.

    The stop bath, fixer, hypo clearing agent, and wash temperatures aren't so critical. Just keep them reasonable within a few degrees of the developer temperature.

  4. #14
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity, do you think there is a way to get water to a repeatable temperature without using a thermometer?

    Just supposition, but, for instance, what if you took a measured amount of water in a styrofoam cup and dropped in ice cubes, one by one, and stirred until the last cube doesn't completely melt? (Or takes longer than a minute to melt?)

    Using the same idea as the "Three Missisippi" test when trying to determine when your barbecue grill is hot enough to cook: Hold your hand over the center of the grill, about a foot above the fire and count, "One Mississippi...Two Mississippi...Three Mississippi..." until you have to pull your hand away. If you have to pull your hand away at "Three Mississippi" the fire is ready.

    Just wondering... What do you think?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    Just out of curiosity, do you think there is a way to get water to a repeatable temperature without using a thermometer?

    Just supposition, but, for instance, what if you took a measured amount of water in a styrofoam cup and dropped in ice cubes, one by one, and stirred until the last cube doesn't completely melt? (Or takes longer than a minute to melt?)

    Using the same idea as the "Three Missisippi" test when trying to determine when your barbecue grill is hot enough to cook: Hold your hand over the center of the grill, about a foot above the fire and count, "One Mississippi...Two Mississippi...Three Mississippi..." until you have to pull your hand away. If you have to pull your hand away at "Three Mississippi" the fire is ready.

    Just wondering... What do you think?
    If your home stays at a constant temperature then keeping a bottle of water stored with your chemicals will give you repeatable temperatures. That is what I do. I still measure the temp before developing but it is always the same.

  6. #16
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Water temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by 4strinbass View Post
    What temperatures should I get from both of them?
    0 and 100 Celsius. 32 and 212 Fahrenheit. Yup and it's for sea level only though. If they hit both points your thermometer should be accurate. A digital thermometer is also quite cheap an provides fast results too but can be tricky to judge how fast something is cooling or heating when not looking at a scale or dial.

  7. #17
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Buy a good thermometer, and develop your film at the same temperature - every time. Unless you don't care about the end results.
    +1

    And a good thermometer doesn't even have to be expensive. A couple of ruined or badly processed rolls of film will pay for one.

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