Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,849   Posts: 1,582,856   Online: 752
      
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973

    Dye-bath sensitizing modern films?

    I know this has been asked before, but I can't find it.

    Can modern films be sensitized by soaking them in a bath of dye solution, as published in some old literature? I came across some info while reading about old IR films last night, and figured that it might be interesting to try.

    Anybody tried this or have some answers?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,130
    Are you talking about hypersensitizing a film? Modern films are already sensitized.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    No - I know that that's pretty much a no go. There [at least used to] be a way to take ortho or blue-sensitive films and dip them in fora dye bath to sensitize for red or infrared.

  4. #4
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,822
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242 View Post
    No - I know that that's pretty much a no go. There [at least used to] be a way to take ortho or blue-sensitive films and dip them in fora dye bath to sensitize for red or infrared.
    Well, think about it, for some reason most current B&W film are sensitive to red light already, some special ones even to IR ....
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  5. #5
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,048
    Basically it's possible but you need that expensive dye, make an apt solution in proper solvent, dip the film, not knowing about the proper time, the drying conditions, the interaction with the film dyes, the adverse effects on other elements in the film...

  6. #6
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    Sure, IR and red sensitive films are available, but IR ones are expensive, and there's no spirit of experimentation involved.

    Some IR dyes, such as neocyanine, are quite cheap, especially considering how little the old literature says is needed.

    I have a ton of X-Ray film hanging around, so I'm thinking that it may be worthwhile to experiment with IR-sensitizing it.

    Aside from that, it's fun and educational to re-invent the wheel sometimes ...

  7. #7
    desertrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    202
    Images
    10
    If you can get the dye, and already have lots of film to experiment with, I would say go for it! Let us know how it works out.

    I've thought of a project for my long term do list, to buy some blue sensitive X-ray film, which I believe has no sensitizing dyes added, and use Erythrosin B to make it orthochromtic. I know where to get the dye, and like you say, it might be fun. I can buy green sensitive X-ray film that is more or less orthochromatic already, but Erythrosin B should make it sensitive into the orange part of the spectrum, with a 'hole' in the blue-green, which I probably don't need anyway.
    Happiness is a load of bulk chemicals, a handful of recipes, a brick of film and a box of paper. - desertrat

  8. #8
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin