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  1. #11
    Benoît99's Avatar
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    Worth reading!

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    Thanks for the link to a comprehensive and informative explanation of film numbering.

  2. #12

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    I have a Graflex Super D in 3-1/4x4-1/4 and there were roll holders for the older Graflex SLRs. These roll film holders took films labeled in the "50" series. The film for my camera was #51. I have a few rolls of Kodak Super-XX in this size that are "Develop Before Nov. 1949". The boxes are labeled as follows:

    KODAK
    SUPER-XX
    HIGH SPEED PANCHROMATIC FILM
    FOR 4 1/4 x 3 1/4 IN. GRAFLEX ROLL HOLDER
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  3. #13
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Why is it called an "iPhone?" Same goes for "iPad," "iBook," "iMac" and the ever popular "iBrator."

    In the case of film numbering, what was once an ordinal system became a complex nominal system. From there, names and numbers become traditional then, finally, a standard.
    The identifier, "120," was once a Kodak-specific number but, now, any roll film that is 61.5mm wide and which provides 12 exposures, 60x60 mm, which meets a few other specs is called "120" no matter who manufactures it.

    Today, we just call it "120 film" just the way most people call any given soft drink "Coke" even if they are drinking cherry soda.
    (That is mostly a regionalism of the Southeastern US but many people in other places have, at least, heard of it.)
    But for the foregoing history lesson, few people know why it's called "120" except to say that it's a number Kodak used when they invented it.

    In 50 or 100 years, it is likely that most people won't know that their smart phone is called "iPhone" because Steve Jobs got a wild hare up his butt and started calling everything, "i-Something."
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #14

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    i think agfa called it b2,
    at least that is the sticker in my agfa box ..

    it was just a kodak number specific for their cameras ...
    their other roll films 116, 620 &c
    might have been exactly the same film as 120 ( or b2 )
    but they had a different spool size to fit exactly in the camera it was designed for ...
    kind of ingenious of GE ..

    i wonder what the other manufacturers in the years between 1900 and 1945
    called all their roll films .. there were probably 50 companies all making film
    one wonders if they just made them as a direct replacement to kodak film
    " use dupont x22, it will fit in your kodak tourist camera instead of kodak 620" &c.
    or did all the film makers also have their own lines of cameras specific for their
    kooky film spools ...

    it would be great to harvest old film and old spools from the cupboards of the ancients, or other people
    who might have used these old films and do a material culture thesis on this subject ...
    ... or a paragraph in a blog somewhere ...

  5. #15
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post

    In 50 or 100 years, it is likely that most people won't know that their smart phone is called "iPhone" because Steve Jobs got a wild hare up his butt and started calling everything, "i-Something."
    If the question comes up, the answer will be "i-dunno".
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #16
    NedL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    If the question comes up, the answer will be "i-dunno".

  7. #17
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i think agfa called it b2,
    at least that is the sticker in my agfa box ..
    B2 = 6x9-film = 120.

    B1 = 6x6-film = 117.

    In the beginning 120-film had markings on the backing paper for 6x9 only. Half frame cameras used two red windows. 6x6-cameras had to use a mechanical frame counter to use 120. 117-film had the same width but was shorter, and had markings for six 6x6 frames only. It also had another type of spool (flanges like 620 but center spool and hole like 120).
    J. Patric Dahlén

  8. #18
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i think agfa called it b2,
    at least that is the sticker in my agfa box ..


    i wonder what the other manufacturers in the years between 1900 and 1945
    called all their roll films .. there were probably 50 companies all making film
    one wonders if they just made them as a direct replacement to kodak film
    " use dupont x22, it will fit in your kodak tourist camera instead of kodak 620" &c.
    or did all the film makers also have their own lines of cameras specific for their
    kooky film spools ...

    In Germany all companies used those letter-designations in those days.
    It may even have been an official standardisation designation.


    A detailed listing of the letter-code is to be found here:
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollfilm

  9. #19

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    JPD + AgX
    thanks for your insights !


    i guess like a lot of things in the first half of the 20th century things were regional
    it is kind of reminds me of fractional stops / apertures/ f-stops back in the day, each maker had
    its own system

    the american system,
    the stoltz system
    the zeiss system
    the voigtlaender system
    the goerz system
    the dallmeyer system

    or that some large format cameras, take a proprietary film holder
    because of a proprietary GG-back &c

    and it wasn't until a full global market that one system ( maybe the kodak system at least in roll film ) ... "one love" happened

    - john

    ps. dr5, sorry if i have derailed your thread ...

  10. #20
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    it wasn't until a full global market that one system ( maybe the kodak system at least in roll film ) ... "one love" happened
    The emergence of any "one system" is also due to the decision of an inventor-manufacturer to give or not to give away the right for employing that system.
    And of course for the others to jump on that train.

    We had different situations in the past of the photochemical industry. Luckily it ended (so far of course) with a joint enterprise: APS

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