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  1. #1

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    School me on Arista EDU B&W Film

    Have a few extra bucks in my pocket this week and thinking of picking up a box of Arista EDU 100ASA in 4x5. I've shot Kodak & Ilford almost exclusively with the exception of experimenting with some Efke. What kind of performance should I expect as far as grain and tonality response. How does it compare with TMax 100?

  2. #2
    PDH
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    Arista 100 is Formapan 100, I shoot it but perfer Forma 200 in 4X5, I rate at 100 and develop in D76 1:2 or Rodinal 1:50. I dont think that Formapan 100 or 200 are t grained films.

  3. #3
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    I love Arista.EDU Ultra, and have used it in every size from 35mm up to 4x5 and in 100 and 400 speeds. PDH is right - it's Fomapan. It is conventional grain, not T-grain, but finer to my eye than the sometimes grungy look of Plus-X or Tri-X. Compared to TMX, I'd say TMX is finer and smoother, but Fomapan is nice and smooth in the midtones.

  4. #4
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Like Mr. Christian, I love Arista EDU ultra. I rate the film at box speed and process it in Xtol full strength. Here are some samples
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...mageuser=37430
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...mageuser=37430
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    One thing to watch for, when developing use half normal strength stop or water , helps avoid pinholes in the emulsion. I prefer to use Pyro developers also, the emulsion is a little soft and can be easily damaged, Pyro developers harden it.
    Last edited by Rick A; 10-11-2012 at 06:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  6. #6
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Great work, Mainecoon! I especially like the second one, the still life.

    Here's a few of my own shots, in different developers and with different cameras:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/otterda...ng/7539651406/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/otterda...ng/6036814123/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/otterda...ng/8024415791/

  7. #7
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    One thing to watch for, when developing use half normal strength stop or water , helps avoid pinholes in the emulsion. I prefer to use Pyro developers also, the emulsion is a little soft and can be easily damaged, Pyro developers harden it.
    Agreed. Avoid ANY finger contact because even on the 35mm base it will show, but much more prominent on 4x5. Never had an issue with that until this film. Also in Pyro I run 2:2:100 rather than my standard 1:1:100 with great results.
    K.S. Klain

  8. #8
    polyglot's Avatar
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    I use latex gloves with 4x5 to prevent finger marks on the Arista 100.

  9. #9

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    Thanks! I read a few review online but wanted to get some APUG first hand reports. I'll pick up a box of 50 and shoot away. I'll probably develop in either D76 or DD-X. I might mix up a batch of Rodinol in the future and a side by side.

  10. #10
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    I recommend EI50 for this film. For rotary development, either Xtol 1+1 for 8:00 or D76 1+1 for 9:00. The Xtol probably achieves ISO100 though I haven't measured properly.

    As to your "compare it with others" question, it's nowhere near as fine as TMX but then this is 4x5 so diffraction is likely more limiting of your resolution. It's similar to FP4 in terms of grain obtrusiveness, maybe a little coarser. Which is to say 'completely invisible in a 16x20" print'. For a really rough comparison, there's about as much information in a 4x5 Foma100 shot as a 6x7 Acros shot; a 4x5 Foma100 is visibly better than a 6x7 TMY2@800 under close inspection but there's not a lot in it. The Foma/Arista 200 is far coarser.

    Here are my samples in 4x5 (Foma 100) and 6x7 (Foma 200). It's been my most-used film in 4x5; after all it's damn cheap and given the optical limits of the format, you're not going to see much (any?) smoother results from better films. And the tonality is great.

    The only big drawback for me is that it has terrible reciprocity failure. I wouldn't ever bother shooting night shots with it and it's annoying even in early evening when you're getting meter readings of 2s-4s.
    Last edited by polyglot; 10-12-2012 at 12:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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