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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    To each their own, but I find changing bags very difficult to use.
    In particular, I miss being able to hear the sounds that the film and the reel make when the film is being loaded.
    Not too mention the increased heat and humidity.
    You could try a Photoflex "film changing room", pictured here:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...g_Room_25.html

    It's spacious inside, so build-up of heat and humidity isn't a problem for me. The material is thin enough that I can clearly hear the sounds the film makes during the load. BTW, I enjoy hearing the smooth sound of film being loaded on to a good Hewes reel.

    Mark Overton

  2. #22
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    You know you LOVE film when.....

    If you can find one the old Fuji FDB12 is the best thing in dark boxes since sundown IMO.

    Here's a few pics.

    http://f.dchome.net/forum.php?mod=viewthread&tid=990239

    They used to turn up on eBay kind of regularly when the great fallout of mini labs closing was occurring. They seem pretty scarce now.

    It folds up like a brief case, and travels well. Then sets up into a roomy dark box in seconds.

    The base is heavy, so it doesn't move around.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #23

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    For most users,the average-sized "Changing Bag" is a clammy horror.
    Those of average intellect,will soon decide to rig up an internal shape,from a small carton to the sine qua non of a light ,demountable frame of plastic tubing.
    Apologies if I have posted this before..
    Ian (try it with an Arriflex 16mm magazine on a windy location) B.
    The single,best thing about a Dark Bag,is that APUGER's without darkrooms,can get into B&W process without the trauma of stuffing towels into lightleaky corners.

  4. #24

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    I struggled with Paterson reels for 120 and then I got this:

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/55043-...el?cat_id=1603

    The plastic guide makes loading 120 film really easy, even in a changing bag.

    Kent

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BardParker View Post
    I struggled with Paterson reels for 120 and then I got this:

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/55043-...el?cat_id=1603

    The plastic guide makes loading 120 film really easy, even in a changing bag.

    Kent
    I agree, and just in case it isn't clear, these fit Paterson tanks as well.

    They are available under a number of brand names - most commonly I have seen them in stores as "AP".
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26

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    If you are loading a daylight tank without a dedicated darkroom the first best way is a Calumet 'Changing Room' (tent), a table top device that packs up and doesn't cost nearly as much as other changing tents (£48 in the UK). The second best way is a changing bag. The third best way is to have a curtain that can be pinned/hooked up against the door instead of taping it each time. The problem with temporary curtains, like a cotton changing bag, is dust that fly's around in the air, so try for a man made fibre.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  7. #27
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    The cardboard guide for the Paterson sounds like a great idea! Thanks.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by BardParker View Post
    I struggled with Paterson reels for 120 and then I got this:

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/55043-...el?cat_id=1603

    The plastic guide makes loading 120 film really easy, even in a changing bag.

    Kent
    Yes, yes and yes. I have never been able to get 120 to load correctly on the paterson reels. Fumbling around with those things is no fun in the dark for 20 mins.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  9. #29
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    I agree, you have to practice. There is only one thing more frustrating than wasting film and that's messing up a film with images on! I still find this the trickiest bit, especially with 120, but I'm getting more confident. One time I dropped the film in the darkroom, and it took me AGES to find it in the dark. It had managed to roll away much further than I expected! You can't tell anyone how to load reels - you just have to work it out for yourself - I bet we all have our own "system".
    After having searched once too often for a dropped SS tank lid in the inky vastness of the darkroom floor (how does space expand in the dark?) I began putting all the needed stuff for loading a tank in a 16 x 20 processing tray. With everything confined I "lose" things far less often.

    Someone suggested that the invisible hand after five minutes is a darkness test: Agreed. Actually tiny pinpoints of light don't seem to make much difference, you can always move to put your body between them and the film.

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