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  1. #11

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    Good Afternoon,

    Slightly off the original topic, but related: For as long as I have been doing darkroom work, I've used Kodabrome RC paper for my contact sheets. When I started, I just followed the instructions about processing, although I was always a bit generous with my washing times. Only in the last several years have I started routinely using a 30-second Perma-Wash treatment for my RC stuff. My oldest contact sheets (mid 1970's) appear to be as good today as when they were first made. They've had no special storage; they're all just punched, put in ring binders along with the negatives, and kept at room temperature. A few stray RC prints from the same era (Kodak, Ilford, Agfa???) likewise show no deterioration. I follow good procedure with both RC and fiber and spend no time worrying about "shelf life." I'm sure I'll be long gone before my prints start to show any problems.

    Konical

  2. #12

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    Sep 2002
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    Ctein may have been speaking of the developer incorporated emulsions. Dan

  3. #13

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    BTW: What paper did Ansel print on?
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  4. #14
    jd callow's Avatar
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    We (it is in my brother's possesion) have a family bible that contains photgraphs from as far back as the civil war. Some are not in great condition, mostly from the mounting glue and handling, but most of the images are good and in tact.

    *

  5. #15

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    Sep 2004
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    I noticed overall yellowing (no stain or patches) on the back of all my FB prints that were made 5-10 years. It's daunting to think what they would be like in 30 years. They were double-fix, selenium toned and thoroughly washed. All are stored in archival boxes and kept in a dry box under tropical temperature. The images are fine, so I reckon that this is a normal paper aging process (paper disintergration if you call it). Does everyone here face this situation? Is this acceptable in the name of archival quality?

  6. #16

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    Jul 2004
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    Prints

    I would tend to believe that your yellowing of the prints is due to improper fixation and or lack of long enough washing times. Of all my older prints done 25+ years ago there is only 1 print that went south on me. I have several prints done by Barbara Crane which I purchased in the early seventies and all are in fine condition. A photograph done by Dan Wiener in 1951 is still pristine so I would assume that this fits the 60+ year catagory. Simply put use Fiber Paper, fix twice, and tone in selenium or gold and the prints should last several lifetimes.
    Regards Peter

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    I agree with Peter, fix twice, hypoclear and wash properly and tone.
    I was at my Dad's house last night and he has a print hanging in a hallway that I gave him in 1975. I know that at school I did not double fix, wash and tone properly, This print is still in wonderful shape, with not hint of problems.

    that would make it 30years old and still running. (by the way , it was a fibre print)

  8. #18
    jovo's Avatar
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    I have a few of my dad's prints made in the 40's and early 50's that are still in superb condition. I've no idea what steps he took to insure longevity...probably whatever was in vogue at the time... but whatever it was, it worked. The prints are warm toned on a beautiful fiber paper...(probably ectalure or some other long since discontinued stock).

    Additionaly, much older family photographs are still extant from the nineteenth century (including a tin type) and they're in excellent condition even though they've not been stored with exceptional care.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  9. #19
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    A few years ago, I bought a photo inkjet printer that claimed archival permanance of several times beyond Cibachrome. As I look at a print on my wall, after just a couple of years it is faded beyond usability, The Reds and Blacks are pretty much all that remain. No problem. I can always make another print. I hope that the CD that the file is stored on is still readable.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #20
    titrisol's Avatar
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    I have prints made by my grandfather, they were forgotten in a closet for ages until my grandma left her house 10 years ago.
    The prints are from the late 20s and they look fine, no bronzing or anything.
    My guess is that it is agfa paper.
    Mama took my APX away.....

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