Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,913   Posts: 1,521,698   Online: 1038
      
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brandon, MB
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,724
    Images
    329

    45 seconds at 45 degrees -- so crazy it just might work?

    On another forum, I recently read a thread about people trying to emulate the "Daido Moriyama look" -- high contrast, hyper grain, etc.

    Now, issues of appropriation aside, I'm curious about screwing around with this concept a bit...just to see what comes out. One of my favorite photo books is by William Klein whose work from the 1950's in NYC also has this hyperkinetic, slightly crazed feel to it. Think of it as trying a bit of freeform jazz instead of classical music, in terms of developing film.

    Anyway, one poster mentioned developing 400 B&W film for 45 seconds at 45 degrees, in Rodinal. Didn't say what dilution but they said they graded their film at 5000!

    I tried this and it was a flop. Negs so thin as to be almost invisible...but I like the idea of harsh grain, etc. for the overall 'feel'.

    Has anyone tried this, or something like it? High temperature, short times? Crazy grain, wacky contrast?
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  2. #2
    Aron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Hungary
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    Has anyone tried this, or something like it? High temperature, short times? Crazy grain, wacky contrast?
    I'd suggest high temperature together with a longer time for 1+25, but I'm sure you know you can use Rodinal also at 1+10. Don't be afraid to experiment and increase your development time considerably. Doing it with an energetic print developer will help, too.

  3. #3
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ye Olde England
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,415
    Images
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    Anyway, one poster mentioned developing 400 B&W film for 45 seconds at 45 degrees, in Rodinal.
    Fahrenheit or Celsius ?

    If the latter, I would have expected the emulsion to start melting before it had a chance to develop.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    848
    You could try print-developer, maybe at a stronger dilution than normal and/or warmer (all the chemicals, not just the dev). The shooting of a sample scene at different EI's on the test film is a good one and, of course, keep notes. You never know what effect you might find that is no use now, but which you might really like for another purpose.

  5. #5
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brandon, MB
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,724
    Images
    329
    Thanks all! Forgot about the Dektol option...I'll keep all posted.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin