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  1. #11

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    Thanks for the further suggestions. At this moment I have NO printing capability and have to resort to scanning my negatives. Perhaps I can still conduct the exposure test? I am very new to this. Thank you.

  2. #12

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    I have virtually no knowledge when it comes to scanning but if scanning is your workflow you could still apply some basic exposure/development testing. The idea of establishing your own working exposure index (ie film speed) is to make sure you give enough exposure to get the shadow detail you want in the negative. As others have said this is to some degree a matter of personal preference, how you develop your film, how you print/scan etc.

    With a general purpose developer like HC-110 and normal development/contrast most peoples' speed ratings with a film like Acros will end up somewhere between 50 and 100, typically closer to the 50 end. Actually with most films many people prefer a similar approach (ie rating the film anywhere from a half to one stop lower than box speed). But again you'd have to decide for yourself. Generally, Acros benefits from a little more exposure and a little less development since it inherently has very high highlight contrast.

  3. #13
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Developing Acros Question

    If you'll be scanning do not compensate with the ISO with HC-110 as scanners IMO do better with slightly less development time for B&W negs. I always cut by dev time 10% at least as I usually scan. Dense or high contrast negs look great in hand but are very tough to scan for wide tonality.
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  4. #14
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Thanks for the further suggestions. At this moment I have NO printing capability and have to resort to scanning my negatives. Perhaps I can still conduct the exposure test? I am very new to this. Thank you.
    Yes, doing the exposure test will be just as valid with a scanning workflow. If you post over on DPUG you will get some more advice on developing for a scanning workflow.

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt View Post
    Yes, doing the exposure test will be just as valid with a scanning workflow. If you post over on DPUG you will get some more advice on developing for a scanning workflow.
    I agree with this. Getting a basic exposure and developing time is always beneficial, irrespective of whether you scan or print in a darkroom.

    Acros, as Michael R points out, is pretty high contrast, especially in highlights. In combination with the very high contrast of the Fuji GA645 that the OP is using Acros definitely benefits from a bit more exposure, and then reducing development in order to keep the highlights under control.

    The only thing that can truly tell us what that exposure and developing time is going to be, for ourselves, is by testing it ourselves. There are always differences between how individuals do things, the equipment they use, lighting conditions they shoot in, water quality, light meter accuracy, etc ad nauseum. A simple film speed test will do a lot for repeatable good results.
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  6. #16
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I shoot Acros full speed when I process it in Xtol. HC-110 requires a little boost in ASA.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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