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  1. #1
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Autographic paper backing

    I'm sure this has been brought up before, but I shoot on a bunch of old Kodak foldies which have an "autographic" feature, the film had a paper back that when pressed on, would allow you to expose a small window on the back of the camera with light and would imprint your film with notes like f stop or location or model name etc.

    Anyone know what kind of backing paper it was and if it can be reproduced?

    Thanks.


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  2. #2
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Autographic paper backing

    Oh this would be for 120 & 116 size films which as we know have a 60mm width for 120 and 70mm width for 116

    I have 620/616 foldies as well but the width and legnth are the same, that's just a spool issue, so just asking about the paper.


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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I shoot on a bunch of old Kodak foldies which have an "autographic" feature, the film had a paper back that when pressed on, would allow you to expose a small window on the back of the camera with light and would imprint your film with notes like f stop or location or model name etc.
    The Autographic film roll consisted of a tissue-like carbon paper sandwiched between the film and the paper backing. See for example http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autographic_film
    Last edited by Prof_Pixel; 10-24-2012 at 11:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    The Autographic film roll consisted of a tissue-like carbon paper sandwiched between the film and the paper backing. See for example http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autographic_film
    This is why when you see a print like this, the writing is white. You could undoubtedly do this on your own, respooling a carbon paper between backing and negative--- I would do a couple experiments to make sure whatever is used to write on the neg will last through the fixer.

    I have written on negs after the fact (development) with a sharpie, and achieved a similar effect.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  5. #5
    AgX
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    That quotation and the reference to Wikipedia do not explain the way an autograph is brought onto the film.
    It seems to have worked this way:

    -) the backing paper is of a kind that has reduced opacity
    -) between film and backing paper is a carbon paper with the paper itself being transparent, with the carbon side facing the backing paper
    -) the space for applying the autograph must give way for the backing paper to lift off from the carbon paper
    -) whilst inscribing with a stylus the waxed carbon is transferred to the backing paper
    -) after inscribing there is enough play between carbon and backing paper for light to enter via the two papers onto the film

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    That quotation and the reference to Wikipedia do not explain the way an autograph is brought onto the film.
    See one of the linked articles: http://en.allexperts.com/q/Photograp...phic-Kodak.htm

  7. #7
    AgX
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    My fault, I did not read beyond the references...
    David Silver: the pressure of the scribe caused the inner carbon layer to compact and become transluscent under the tip of the scribe
    Though that "compacting" of the carbon is for me hard to comprehend. At least less hard than the "play" between paper layers I hinted at.
    Last edited by AgX; 10-24-2012 at 04:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
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    So, it is actually "burning" the writing into the negative? Interesting.

    I have a couple of Autographic cameras and have occasionally thought of tinkering with them. This kind of renews my interest.
    Randy S.

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