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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I'm finding that my camera, a Fuji GA645 produces images that are VERY contrasty. Regarding B & W film, what development methods can I use to reduce contrast by 10% or so? I need more light in those shadows.

    Thanks!
    Fuji GA645 is not an instant camera, how come "produces images that are VERY contrasty"?
    I bet You assume about whats on the film based on what You see on the monitor, from scans done by someone else.
    Its still the year of the dragon, so have fun with film and GA645

  2. #12
    MDR
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    If you want details in the shadows you can either meter for the shadows, use a speed increasing developer (Diafine, DD-X, etc...) but meter for the film speed in this case 100ASA,a blue filter can reduce contrast and increases fog on foggy days, but you lose speed. split grade printing a few second grade 0 or 1 and the rest at grade 3 or 4, use a lower paper grade 11/2 or 2 instead of 3. If you scan lower the contrast setting on your scanner or tell the scanning operator to do so.

    Good luck

  3. #13

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    RattyMouse: As others have said, if you want more open shadows and lower contrast you need more exposure and less development. That would be the easiest way. Having said that - the "10%" you are after is very small and can likely be tweaked out of your printing/scanning without adjusting your film exposure/development.

    If you want to maximize the amount of film speed for your shadows and lower overall contrast you can also try diluting your developer more, extending development time and increasing the amount of time between agitation intervals. This would take some experimentation though. A naturally compensating developer does the same thing.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I'm finding that my camera, a Fuji GA645 produces images that are VERY contrasty. Regarding B & W film, what development methods can I use to reduce contrast by 10% or so? I need more light in those shadows.

    Thanks!
    Lack of shadow detail is an exposure issue. Open up a stop at the camera.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Scenario 1: Use lower film speed (with the same film) -> slower shutter speeds or wider apertures.
    Method:
    - Expose more = more shadow detail.
    - Develop less = don't block up the highlights because of the increased exposure.

    Scenario 2: Use the same film speed -> change developer.
    Method:
    - Use a speed enhancing developer. Xtol, TMax, Ilfotec DD-X, Ilford Microphen, for example.

    Scenario 3: Change developing technique
    Method:
    - Dilute your developer more for longer developing times.

    You can combine any or all of these techniques, depending on how much shadow detail you want/need.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 10-25-2012 at 08:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Scenario 1: Use lower film speed -> slower shutter speeds or wider apertures.
    Method:
    - Expose more = more shadow detail.
    - Develop less = don't block up the highlights because of the increased exposure.
    I agree with Thomas,

    And might add... Scenario 1 is the easiest.

    - Expose more = more shadow detail.
    - Develop less = less contrast.

    Both are problems you wanted to solve - solution to those problems.

    ---
    We can save Zone System technique for later... even without full calibration, understanding it will make you more confident in the exposure you choose and the development time you give.

    There's nothing harder to solve on a negative than empty shadows, while it would have been so easy to fix in the camera by giving enough exposure for the shadows when you shot.

  7. #17
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    I agree with Thomas & Bill with the caveat for Ratty Mouse that contrast adjustment, when using a lab for prints and scans, is simply a matter of telling the lab what is expected.

    Even if you self develop and send your finished negs to the lab, the lab may then "correct" the print contrast and exposure to "their sensibility" rather than yours.

    Ratty Mouse until you have your lab try to reprint the negs in question to your preferences you don't really even know if you need to expose differently to get more shadow detail.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18

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    What film are you using?

    It may or may not be so scientifically but I've seen Tmax film produce images that LOOK higher contrast than traditional grain ones.

    If your neg is VERY contrasty, 10% reduction may not be enough....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #19
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Ratty Mouse: are you developing yourself, or are you having someone else do the developing and printing? The fault is definitely not in the camera. Before I did anything, I'd take a good look at the negatives. In the shadows (nearly clear areas), can you see detail in them that you can't see in the print? That suggests that the printing isn't as good as it could be. If the printer printed at too high of a contrast level, you could loose the shadow details. Before I'd change the exposure, Id verify that the negatives are the issue and not the printing.
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  10. #20
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I'm finding that my camera, a Fuji GA645 produces images that are VERY contrasty. Regarding B & W film, what development methods can I use to reduce contrast by 10% or so? I need more light in those shadows.

    Thanks!
    While others have given you decidedly more productive information regarding shadow resolution, I would like to make clear in the hope that you and others will not get caught up in your own analysis, that your initial premise is deeply flawed, if not entirely without merit. Film cameras by themselves do not produce contrasty "images". Film contrast is affected by lens design, lighting, type of film emulsion, exposure, and development. Analog print or hardcopy (i.e., the positive monochrome "image") contrast is affected by paper type and emulsion (light filtration), exposure, developer, toning, and display (glazing and lighting).
    Last edited by ROL; 10-25-2012 at 11:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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