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  1. #1

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    How to lower contrast?

    I'm finding that my camera, a Fuji GA645 produces images that are VERY contrasty. Regarding B & W film, what development methods can I use to reduce contrast by 10% or so? I need more light in those shadows.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    If you need more light in the shadows try increasing your exposure, use your spot meter to get the shadow tones correct (if you have one). Then reduce your development times to control the highlights, usually around 15% reduction in developing time is recommended.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    If you need more light in the shadows try increasing your exposure, use your spot meter to get the shadow tones correct (if you have one). Then reduce your development times to control the highlights, usually around 15% reduction in developing time is recommended.

    Thanks. Since I am shooting ISO100 film, I was hoping that more exposure would not be needed due to trying to keep shutter speeds up. I see that is not how it works.

  4. #4
    Athiril's Avatar
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    You can correct gamma in scanning/post and in dark room printing.

  5. #5
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Thanks. Since I am shooting ISO100 film, I was hoping that more exposure would not be needed due to trying to keep shutter speeds up. I see that is not how it works.
    Since you're shooting 645, you could choose an ISO 400 film and shoot it at 200 or 250. Fine grain/slow film is no benefit (to me) when there is motion blur due to handholding at lower shutter speed than should have been. This is an idealistic goal of course. Fine grain with motion blur can be beautiful in some cases in the right hands.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Since you're shooting 645, you could choose an ISO 400 film and shoot it at 200 or 250. Fine grain/slow film is no benefit (to me) when there is motion blur due to handholding at lower shutter speed than should have been. This is an idealistic goal of course. Fine grain with motion blur can be beautiful in some cases in the right hands.
    Thank you, I will experiment with this idea in future.

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Saying what has been said in another way, exposure determines whether there is detail in the shadows, and development determines how the highlights appears.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Do you have a spotmeter or incident meter? Both these types of metering can ensure you get enough shadow detail. Shots like your nightscapes would be a challenge in black and white because the shadows can be truly empty while highlights coming from neon signs can hit the other extreme.

    With a spotmeter, you would choose the "important" shadow. Then (using Zone System terminology) place it on Zone II, III or IV depending on philosophy. When you meter carefully you can use the full speed, again depending on philosophy.

    When I say I shoot ISO 400 film at 250, I am spotting the shadows and placing them on Zone II. Someone who spotmeters shadows and places them on Zone III could rate the same film at 400 and end up exposing using the same f/stop and shutter speed combination as me.

  9. #9

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    Sorry, but the zone system is waaay beyond me at this point.

  10. #10
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Sorry, but the zone system is waaay beyond me at this point.
    The ZS is not a difficult thing to learn. It can be a bit intimidating to start with, but once you understand the pinciples, the in-practice is pretty easy.

    It's not too difficult if you start your research with some research from more basic sites (basic in their way of explaining, not basic in their content).

    I'd start with looking here.

    Then, I'd have a look here.

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