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  1. #1

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    What is This? Plus-X pinholes or emulsion damage

    These are a roll of PX125, 120, fresh, dev'd in D76 1+1 at normal time, stop and fix in normal fix. I did some rolls of Tri-X in the same stop and fix and made fresh developer from the same jug and those rolls were fine.
    Two types of damage seen in the dog and the window pictures: there are no marks on that window, that's all emulsion holes. The marks in the shadows of the dog picture seem to be rubs or clouds in the emulsion. Then a couple of pix of the roll from an angle to see the emulsion damage.

    Anyone know what this might be?

    thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20120914_02sm.JPG   20120914_06sm.JPG   20120914view_001sm.JPG   20120914view_002sm.JPG  
    Jeff Glass

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  2. #2
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    Hi,

    there was no big change in temperature of developer / fixer / water?

    BR,
    Darko

  3. #3

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    The last time I used Plus-X was in the 1980's--it was 120 Plus-X Pro, and I got pinholes. I quit using Plus-X because of it, as I did not get pinholes with Tri-X or Verichrome Pan.

    Perhaps it was technique, perhaps not. But I no longer use an acid stop bath, and prefer, instead, a water rinse. I use an alkaline fixer. I suggest you try using a water rinse instead of stop bath, at least as a test, and see if that cures the problem.

    Charlie Strack

  4. #4
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    You have 2 problems here, at least. In the dog picture the spots are white and in the window picture they are black.

    Now thinking of the negative, the dog has dark spots and the window has light spots. Typically, air bubbles or pinholes are low in development and circular leaving lower development on the negative and thus light spots. So, the window picture might classify as having pinholes but they are not round in your example. The dog picture has what looks like dust or dirt. The window picture has some appearance of pinholes.

    Did you prewet the film before development? Many films cry for this treatment to prevent pinholes (air bubbles). This varies with film and often vary from film to film type in the same tank.

    Is your drying area dust free?

    If there are rough spots on the film it can be either dust or lint or even particulate matter in your water supply.

    PE

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the comments.

    @darkosaric: There was no big change in temperature. I keep all chems in a water bath at the same temp.

    @PE: I did not pre-wet the film, never have, with Plus-X or Tri-X. Could not be the drying area as these problems showed after processing before drying. I use well water so I guess it's possible there was particulate matter in the water or maybe I did not rinse the tank at first? But the other films processed at the same time were fine.

    Any other suggestions? Culprits so far: dust, pinholes from temp change, pinholes from acid stop.
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    Unless there was something way off in the stop pH or something, I'd rule out acid stop/pinholes, especially since the developer was D76 (no carbonate). I have a hard time believing this rare phenomenon would occur with a venerable product like Plus-X.

    I also highly doubt any of this is related to temperatures during processing - unless you had a serious temperature shock or very high processing/drying temperatures. Again, Plus-X is not a film that would be sensitive in this particular way even to fairly sizeable temperature fluctuations during processing (image quality might be compromised, but the film should/would not be damaged in the way OP presents).

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Could one suspect that the film has been cold stored in a freezer, and you didn't thaw it out long enough before you used it? (Condensation issues, etc)
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    PX 120? try some fresh film. Expired film is a headache as you see.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jglass View Post

    @PE: I did not pre-wet the film, never have, with Plus-X or Tri-X. Could not be the drying area as these problems showed after processing before drying. I use well water so I guess it's possible there was particulate matter in the water or maybe I did not rinse the tank at first? But the other films processed at the same time were fine.

    Any other suggestions? Culprits so far: dust, pinholes from temp change, pinholes from acid stop.
    If you see them after processing (during drying) it is probably dust in the air or dirt in the water.

    PE

  10. #10
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    The first photo of the dog almost looks like moisture buildup, like the emulsion was sweating when the exposure was made, then it was rolled up into the paper. You commented the film was fresh, was it ever frozen before you got it? Given what I have seen, I would concur with Thomas that it wasn't fully thawed out. The damage is physical in nature, reticulation doesn't do that (heat) from temp fluctuations. The last photo is the strongest evidence of this concept.

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