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  1. #1
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Contact sheets: MCP 312 without filter.

    I have made contact sheets of 35mm negs with base exposure of 20.2 seconds @f/11 without Filter.

    Paper: MCP 312 semi-matte

    Developer: Adotol NE - 1 min.

    Enlarger: Focomat Ic.

    Film: APX 100 and Fomapan 100 developed with Rodinal 1+50.

    Contact sheets gave an overall idea about the print exposures and as well as neg exposures(APX is lossy compared to Fomapan).

    Now I am curious about the effect of filters(atleast Grade 3) before I burn some more paper.

    One thing for sure is it will affect the contrast but I wonder whether it will effect the base exposure too...if so, how much? Provided the height, the lens opening and other variables are kept constant.
    Last edited by baachitraka; 11-05-2012 at 11:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  2. #2
    piu58's Avatar
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    > effect of filters(atleast Grade 3).

    Usually you wish the contact sheets to bee flat - to see what is in the negative.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  3. #3

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    Many variable contrast papers are "speed matched" to a light grey tone somewhere between zone VI and VII, for grades 0/(00)-3.5. So if that happens to be the tonality on which you based your main exposure it should remain relatively constant as you adjust filtration within that range. However this will vary depending on the paper, the filters/enlarger etc etc. Further, local contrast will change in addition to total contrast so as you work on the print you'll likely need to make adjustments to the base exposure, add burning/dodging etc.

    This is all best done by eye as you proceed from contact sheet through work prints. A soft contrast contact sheet/proof sheet is a good start since it will show you what is in the negative.

  4. #4
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    No reason ever to expose multigrade paper without any filter. Contact sheets always show less information than contained in the negatives. I find their utility questionable.

  5. #5
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    We all do it differently. I find soft grade contacts pointless, because they tell everything and nothing. I prefer to do it as Barry Thornton suggested in his article: http://www.awh-imaging.co.uk/barrythornton/unzone.htm
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  6. #6
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    From the article, I understood as follows

    * Make test strips of film base + fog and find the minimum time for maximum black. For 35mm with Grade 3 filter.
    * Make contact sheet with minimum time.
    * Shadows will tell how much correction is required in the exposure.
    * Highlights will teach about the development times.

    ** I conclude that overexposed and under developed will print with good tonal seperation.

    Do I miss anything...
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  7. #7

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    That test seems geared more toward determining your exposure index and developing time for the film, rather than making a contact sheet for choosing negatives to print. I assumed you had already done your film tests. For printing, I like a low contrast contact sheet because I can see how much detail I have in the shadows and highlights. But I guess everyone does it differently so there is no right or wrong answer. Whatever works.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Do I miss anything...
    No, I don't think you did miss anything. I came to the same conclusions as you. The only issue I can see is that contacts of 135 negs are so small that you might need a magnifying glass/loupe to check if shadows and highlights are as they should be. 1x1.5 inches isn't much of an area for a good examination.

    pentaxuser

  9. #9
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    I try to print that at-least impresses my wife. Everytime I show her something and she goes like 'Well, you can take to a lab for printing...in indian accent'

    :-(
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.



 

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