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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by GarageBoy View Post
    Thanks!


    What size(s) graduates do I need (at least 1L one to mix enough for my tank, right?) and how many will I need (one each for dev and fix?)?

    Should I put my fixer into a few small bottles and use 1 at a time til it runs out? Or just keep 1 large bottle and dump back into it?



    Also, I heard that photo flo ruins plastic reels?

    fotoflo is harmless to plastic reels, one 1-pint bottle will last you about 5 years. maybe 10. Mine has. I use 1/4 capful per tank with 3 films.

    I use corning glass 1- and 2-cup measures -- and a 4-cup. They're glass, they wash, use them for dev or fix, wash again then you use them for cooking, 35 years and nobody's been poisoned.

    pour the fixer back into the 1-gallon bottle and use until it is expired. You know it is expired when it takes longer than 5 minutes for the milky look on your film to clear. When it does, dump the fixer out of the film container and into the sink, pour more in from the gallon, repeat until the film is clear (it will) and then dump the rest and mix new.

  2. #12
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    You only "need" one graduate to hold enough developer to fill the tank.

    Soon as I fill the tank with developer and finish initial agitation, I rinse out my only 32-ounce graduate and start to fill it with water that I will add a few cc of stop bath to...

    But it wouldn't hurt to have two more, separate graduates for stop bath and fixer, so you don't have to juggle.

    I tend to put my stock developer and fixer bottles in a larger tub of water to get to temperature. The developer gets mixed 1:1 at the last minute, with running water that is already up to temperature.

  3. #13
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    You only "need" one graduate to hold enough developer to fill the tank.
    I think it's a good idea to have only one.

    If you mix up developer, fixer and stop (if you use it) before you start then you have the potential to use them in the wrong order.

    If you mix the developer first then the stop whilst the developer is in the tank followed by the fixer whilst the stop is in the tank, you eliminate that possibility of error.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #14
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I think it's a good idea to have only one.

    If you mix up developer, fixer and stop (if you use it) before you start then you have the potential to use them in the wrong order.

    If you mix the developer first then the stop whilst the developer is in the tank followed by the fixer whilst the stop is in the tank, you eliminate that possibility of error.


    Steve.
    Wow, glad you stopped me before I made that mistake. No wonder I never pour the stop into the tanks first. It would have baffled me no end if I bought another beaker and suddenly started doing that all the time.

  5. #15

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    What equipment do I need to develop 35mm B&W film (besides the chemicals and film?)

    Until I got some film clips I used clothes pegs. Fiddly but worked.
    Before I got a change bag (actually a dark box but same idea) I used to go into the bedroom and close the curtains, turn off the hall light, prop up the blankets and reach under to load the film.
    Never had an issue but yes it was fiddly and a change bag is easier.

    For temp control I use a plastic tub and half fill with water just over 20c and put chems bottles in there.
    Add hot or cold to get it about right and after a while the chems are close enough.
    If they're slightly off I use Ilford's correction chart for my dev and adjust time accordingly but always get it within one or two degrees.
    The longer I do it the more gadgets I get such as extra grads and 1l jugs with lids for each chem, permanently marked with the type of chemical, fitted with lids so each can be made up and the jugs put in the tempering bath in advance, and now I have a plywood drying cabinet to cut down on dust (and bloody cats! They LOVE chewing up fresh negs!).
    Also I'm moving Into stainless tank and reels which are harder to load but easier to clean.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    You don’t need a cassette opener, as when you rewind the film, listen and feel for it coming off the take up spool and then stop. In this way when you open the back of the camera some of the film leader will still be visible. You can then pull out about 6”, as you probably wasted this amount when loading the film into the camera. Cut the leader off and load the first 6” into the spiral in daylight. Thus making it easier to do the rest when in the bag.
    What Clive says is true in terms of ease of loading the spiral the first few times, but IMHO it's well worth practicing doing the whole process in the dark and removing the film by dismantling the cassette. As it is, the film gets dragged through the light trap twice anyway on the way out and then back in, each time having the potential to cause tramlines/scratches if the trap has picked up any particles of crud. Taking the cassette apart avoids hauling the film through the cassette jaws a third time. For that reason, I always wind the film right back into the cassette if it is to be processed commercially (as with slides for me). Against all of this is the argument by some that the light trap is more effective when film protrudes through it....... !
    Best wishes,
    Steve

  7. #17
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    I keep my chemicals in the fridge and use the microwave to bring them to temperature, just being careful not to overheat them.

  8. #18
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    What equipment do I need to develop 35mm B&W film (besides the chemicals and film?)

    To mix and store my stop, fix, and HCA, I use 1-liter plastic Datatainer bottles. They're rather inexpensive. I label the bottles AND the caps so I don't accidentally grab the wrong chemical.

    Another neat thing for measuring out very small quantities of HC-110 or Rodinal is a baby's medicine spoon. They look like plastic test tubes, with spoonlike ends, and can be found easily in drug stores. They hold about 10mL and are super easy to read with precision.

  9. #19

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    Thanks guys!
    I have a dispensing syringe that I use for filling up fountain pen ink cartridges that is 30mL. I heard that HC110 is syrupy, so will it pour of of those kid medicine spoons completely? (i.e. is it thick enough that I won't get all of it into the water?)

    Also, I noticed that Kodak's fixer powder package makes a full gallon. So I dump the contents into a bottle, fill it to the brim and shake it up? Or should I do that in another container to ensure more even mixing?

  10. #20

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    The syringe is the way to go. I use HC110 as well, and it was a real pain until I got one.

    As for the powder fixer, definitely mix it in a separate container. Don't dump it in all at once, add it slowly while stirring. On second thought, why use powdered fixer at all? Kodak (or Ilford) Rapid Fixer is easier to mix, doesn't have to be made all at once, and it's faster, which really helps when working with TMAX films.

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