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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSun View Post
    You almost never do color printing in open trays. You need to invest a film/print processor. Also, by not doing in the open tray, it takes some of the enjoyment away from printing photos. You can't see the images coming up.

    As to the enlarger, all enlargers can do B&W, but only the color head can do color printing. You can argue that any BW enlargers can do color printing with proper filters, but clearly that is a pain to do that.
    Many of the colour printers here do use open trays and room temperature - including a certain Photo Engineer.

    And there are lots of used colour heads around (many of which are being used with B & W variable contrast paper).

    There is more discussion here about B & W because there are more people who come here who want to discuss B & W than almost all other internet resources.

    And individual colour filters are surprisingly easy to use, although I don't really want to go back to them.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    MDR
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    Making a superb color photo, that is more than just color and effect is in my opinion more difficult than making a decent B/W photo. All in all they are equally hard to do. In reality there are about 20 times more color photographers than B/W photographers and this might be the reason why the B/W Forum is more active. Color = everyone does it. B/W less used therefore better. I personally prefer B/W but there are quiet a few color photos I'd love to own none by the Düsseldorfer or Finnish School though.

    Dominik

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's really because there's far more controls and variables with B&W film processing and printing as a consequence thre's actually far more to learn and discuss..

    I used to do a lot of colour processing mostly E6 (E3/4 before that) and some Cibachrome/Ilfochrome printing, and also some C41 negs and RA-4 prints. Howevever once mastered there's few variables.

    Ian

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It's really because there's far more controls and variables with B&W film processing and printing as a consequence thre's actually far more to learn and discuss..

    I used to do a lot of colour processing mostly E6 (E3/4 before that) and some Cibachrome/Ilfochrome printing, and also some C41 negs and RA-4 prints. Howevever once mastered there's few variables.

    Ian
    I agreed with some of it. I would not say that there is not much to learn the color photography. But the mechanics of it just took the control out of your hands, into the processor. If you do not follow the right temperature and chemical mix, the results are ugly.

    But for BW, the latitude is huge. Even some badly processed negatives or positives can yield some interesting results. There is little hurdle to get in and it costs very little. And the experience is rewarding. All the above are just opposite with color photography.

    But one thing I know that: I printed some BW photos of my young daughter. I showed her my BW prints and she does not show any interest at all. She said she likes colored better. I was disappointed with one night's BW printing work, but I understood.

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I have never tried color. I do a bit of colour though!


    Steve.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It's really because there's far more controls and variables with B&W film processing and printing as a consequence thre's actually far more to learn and discuss..

    Ian
    +1 as they say here. I'd just add based to your quote above based on my extensive reading of APUG posts ...." and debate, occasionally disagree about and very occasionally have a serious altercation about things B&W

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Color film and printing is a fairly standardized process.

    Black and white is open to literally any number of altercations with developers that you can either buy or mix yourself, toners, film developing techniques with all sorts of varied dilution and agitation, tons of different films and papers, as well as alternative printing techniques such as platinum/palladium, kallitypes, lith printing, bromoil, or even photogravure. If you're so inclined you could also get into wet plate photography, or even emulsion making and coating your own plates and paper. With color you have C41 film and RA-4 paper, if you wish to do things in purely analog fashion, and E6. There are other techniques such as gum printing with many colors (which require separation negatives, best done digitally), color carbro printing, and gumoil. In a word I think you can sum it up in the word 'choices'. There simply isn't nearly as much to discuss about color film and printing.

    Contrary to popular opinion, I think that black and white, as a concept, is infinitely more difficult because of all those variables mentioned above.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18
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    And, if I dare say, many color printing processes these days fall into a hybrid category, so it's not entirely on topic for APUG, which may also explain why there are far fewer discussing color printing than b/w here.

  9. #19

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    Well the processing part of colour printing is fairly mechanical, you can alter contrast with additives, but you can do alot when exposing the paper, inc changing filtration for dodging and burning. Good for late nights in the darkroom and using up lots of paper.
    Bob

  10. #20

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    I think color paper is even cheaper than the BW paper, at least for me

    I do both BW and color. And I'd like to spend more time with photography, less time with all the mechanics. To me, I do not have time to experiment with all the BW chemicals and processes. I tried a couple and stick with one that I'm very happy with. Then for the printing, I know how to control the density and contrast and get the effect I want. Then it is time to move on. It is never ending to try new stuff.

    The other thing comes to mind is that, BW photography is considered ART and color photography is mainstream and less of an ART. This has nothing to do with photography, but just with the concept of their popularity.

    If today I shoot with a TLR, others would think I'm an artist since I use an old and strange camera. But TLR cameras were so popular in the old days and they are hardly considered artists' tools.

    Actually by now almost all film photography should be considered ART since the mainstream has already moved on to digital....

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