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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelorenzo View Post
    Right, negatives are clear in those areas. So that rules out a light problem, it seems like just somehow there wasn't any development along the film edges of six frames, even though the film edge markings look fine. I'm trying to figure out if it could be something in camera but I've developed film from the same camera/lens that was taken after those pictures with no problems.

    I did re-fix the film tonight so if nothing else I've learned all about not fixing film correctly. The negatives look much better and hopefully that will explain some of the problems I've been having with scanning.
    I hope this doesn't sound like preaching, but test your fixer every time before you use it. Take a small piece of undeveloped film, put it in the fix you intend to use, and time how quickly it clears the emulsion. Rapid fixers shouldn't take more than 30-40 seconds, and regular fix not more than a minute to a minute and a half. If it starts to take longer you might run the risk of using exhausted fixer and it's time to retire it and mix fresh.

    Also, measure the exact volume of fixer you need to basically fill the tank, minus a little at the top, so that you cover the reels entirely, but also to give a little bit of room for the medium to move around in the tank when you agitate. Don't fill the tank entirely.

    If you already know this, then great, if not you have something to look into.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    ann
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    Could be a "fat" roll. Very common with 120 film.

    Be sure you remove the film from the camera in dim light and it is rolled tightly , or a "fat" roll can be the results.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ann View Post
    Could be a "fat" roll. Very common with 120 film.

    Be sure you remove the film from the camera in dim light and it is rolled tightly , or a "fat" roll can be the results.
    Wouldn't that cause the affected areas to be over-exposed, though? (white instead of black in the positive image).
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14

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    if they are clear in those areas, but the edges are normal, then what that tells me in inadequate exposure, for whatever reason, not a fixing problem..fixer removes un-exposed silver

    Have you had your camera check for ghosts lately?

  5. #15
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Also, measure the exact volume of fixer you need to basically fill the tank, minus a little at the top, so that you cover the reels entirely, but also to give a little bit of room for the medium to move around in the tank when you agitate. Don't fill the tank entirely.
    I do measure the amounts of chemicals I pour into the tank BUT I'm not super precise about it. I do remember with at least one of these rolls that the tank felt like it was overfull with developer, maybe that screwed up my agitation? Even if it wasn't the source of the problem it's one more thing not to do next time, thanks.

  6. #16
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    Have you had your camera check for ghosts lately?
    No ghosts in there that I can see.

    The only other camera-related problem I can think of is cold temperatures. We were out on an hour+ walk and I was carrying my camera on a strap, it was somewhere around -10 to -15 C. So I suppose it is possible that the first frames of the film were OK but as the camera or film got colder this somehow happened at the end of the roll. I've never had any cold issues in the past with my 645N but this 645NII is new to me and is about to go through it's first winter.

  7. #17
    ann
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Wouldn't that cause the affected areas to be over-exposed, though? (white instead of black in the positive image).
    oops, your right, my brain is looking at it backwards. Glad you caught that
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  8. #18

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    Yes never a good idea to overfill a tank but how much this affects movement depends on the design of the tank. The Jobo has a great deal of expansion available due to the shape of the top but Durst tanks much less so. I have never tried it but I suspect that it would be possible in the case of a Durst tank to fill it right up to the top of the light trapped filling hole and have almost the equivalent of a solid block of developer such that on inversion very little movement of the liquid would take place

    pentaxuser

  9. #19
    adelorenzo's Avatar
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    I just processed another roll from that camera and same problem. Instead of being 3-4 frames at the end of the roll this time it was 5-6 frames in the middle of the roll. It was a bone dry reel and everything seemed fine loading it and when it was coming out of the tank. I really don't think there is a problem with the processing, I've done enough rolls to know when I've screwed something up.

    Since the sides of the negatives are dark this is leading me to believe it is a camera issue and the film is not getting light somehow. Would it be possible that I have film problem? Maybe the film is curling and so the top and bottom edges are not getting exposed? I was shooting at -30 C and the camera was very cold so I am wondering if this is causing some kind of problem in the camera.

    I'm going to try shooting a test roll indoors to see if cold is a factor, and also will try a different film back to see if that is part of the problem. Maybe my pressure plate isn't working in the cold?

    Here are some more scans, as always any thoughts and feedback welcome.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scan-121205-0010.jpg   Scan-121205-0014.jpg   Scan-121205-0016.jpg  

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Was this shot using a Pentax 645NII? If not, what type of camera?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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