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  1. #21

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    with metal reels (spirals) at least, I've found 120 to be *easier* than 35mm. The wire and the spacing are much larger. 220 was hard, but I'll probably never develop another 220 film unless some b/w comes back on the market.
    ---
    mike rosenlof
    louisville colorado usa

  2. #22
    polyglot's Avatar
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    If you're struggling with plastic reels, blast them with a hairdryer for a minute immediately before loading, even if they were already "dry". They need to be incredibly dry.

    The other thing I found is that for Paterson reels at least, some films are more "papery" (most Ilfords) and some more "plasticky" (Acros, E6) and the papery ones load more-easily.

  3. #23

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    Do I have to use reels?

    I got a scrap roll in each size and just practiced in daylight then with eyes shut then in a change bag.
    Soon get used to it.

  4. #24
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs View Post
    Im not very good at them. Ok on 35mm, but a bit daunted on what to do with 120 hands get sweaty in the change bag, so if you dont get it right it just gets more complicated!
    My solution: don't use a change bag. I black out my bathroom with curtain fabric to load film holders and put film in tanks.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  5. #25

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    My sixth grade teacher taught us black and white photography. We dropped the film in a gallon jug and shook it in the dark to process it. Worked great.

  6. #26
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    The Jobo 1500 reels are probaly the "slickest" of the plastic reels. I find the Jobo tanks are less likly to leak than the Paterson System 4. The super system 4 has a better seal than the older Patersons, but I dislike the time it takes to put on the cap beofre you can invert the tank. The older Jobo 1000 reels and tanks are also fairly good, but not as good as the 1500 Series. Hopefully the new production Jobo will be a good as the existing ones....

    Stainless stell is slightly harder to get used to. the Loader device is a great help to start. You proably don't need it after a while. Trick with Stainless is keeping the film feeding ABSOUTLY straight, or you will have blotches when the rows touch.

    I have only used the Sea-Saw method once, and it does work, but is hard to get right in the dark.

    Comercial labs often have (or had) Dip-and-Dunk machines where the film is hung on film clips and the machine lowers it into a deep tank of developer. There were special clips that let a 36 exposure roll be looped in the middle so that the tank did not have to be 6 feet deep. iften the film would be liffted up and advanced every 30 seconds so it went into a new tank, and the thre were enough tanks (or wide enough tanks) to reach the required developing time.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  7. #27

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    Also make sure everything is dry. I used to rinse my reels and tank before loading until I learned that was likely the cause of my loading problems

  8. #28
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cepwin View Post
    Also make sure everything is dry. I used to rinse my reels and tank before loading until I learned that was likely the cause of my loading problems
    Yup. Always have enough reels for the amount of film you plan to be developing at one time. They are inexpensive (most of the time) and it's the only thing you really need to be dry, so you can just have the single tank and 12 reels if you want to. Heh.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  9. #29
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    I remember starting out my B&W processing many years ago, with an old Kodak "lasagne" style apron and developing tank. It didn't have it's lid, but the Kodak film container lids fitted perfectly (grey style). Processed hundreds of rolls this way, before I finally found a Patterson tank that was a good price and not damaged. Could be a novel way to process in a bucket. . . . . .

    I actually wish I hadn't got rid of it, because it was an extremely quick and easy way to load film for processing and I haven't actually seen one around since.

  10. #30

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    Another memory from pre-history just surfaced. Long ago 16mm instrument-camera film would often be chucked in a bucket for development etc. All you had to get off it was the time (from the clock in the shot) that the other dials and numbers showed whatever-it-was. So, as the OP jokingly suggested, buckets really have been used to develop long bits of film - though with some slight damage that probably made the results unusable for enlarging.

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