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  1. #41
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Indeed, I've heard about such processing as well.

    I do think that developing the film "by eye" will prove to be much more difficult than it might seem.
    The light is dimmer, which will make it harder to judge the density, most likely forcing you to shoot a lot of ortho-film before you get the "eye" adjusted.
    - I am also unsure if you can actually develop the whole time in a red safe-light, or if you can just safely inspect it shortly during development.

    It may be that normal development in a closed tank will be just as (in)effective to home in on the perfect development for it.

    (Rollei Ortho 25 is also supposed to be pretty contrasty, so from what I read on the links, you'd need to use a compensating developer to "flatten out the curve" on it a bit).

    I actually do have a roll of Rollei Ortho 25 on thawing from the freezer right now, planning on shooting it tomorrow, as it is very foggy and non-contrasty over here this weekend, so it should be good........probably.....
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    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
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  2. #42

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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Helinophoto View Post
    Indeed, I've heard about such processing as well.

    I do think that developing the film "by eye" will prove to be much more difficult than it might seem.
    The light is dimmer, which will make it harder to judge the density, most likely forcing you to shoot a lot of ortho-film before you get the "eye" adjusted.
    - I am also unsure if you can actually develop the whole time in a red safe-light, or if you can just safely inspect it shortly during development.

    It may be that normal development in a closed tank will be just as (in)effective to home in on the perfect development for it.

    (Rollei Ortho 25 is also supposed to be pretty contrasty, so from what I read on the links, you'd need to use a compensating developer to "flatten out the curve" on it a bit).

    I actually do have a roll of Rollei Ortho 25 on thawing from the freezer right now, planning on shooting it tomorrow, as it is very foggy and non-contrasty over here this weekend, so it should be good........probably.....
    I like contrary, that's why I like slow film


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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  3. #43
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The Rollie appears to be panchromatic.

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/pdf/pr...llei_Ortho.pdf
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #44

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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    The Rollie appears to be panchromatic.

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/pdf/pr...llei_Ortho.pdf
    Irony... Haha. (And before I meant I like contrasty... Silly auto correct).


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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  5. #45
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Thanks I did see that film before actually but it's ortho, so I would need an actual dark room and a red light to develop it properly wouldn't I? And I don't have that, I have a sink and a light tight Patterson tank...


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    The term you are looking for is "development by inspection".

    And that process is really only particularly useful for sheet film, because otherwise how are you going to customize development for each individual shot?

    It is still a very useful process (think of most of Karsh's iconic work), but it isn't necessary - time and temperature in a light tight tank will work just peachy.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #46
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The term you are looking for is "development by inspection".

    And that process is really only particularly useful for sheet film, because otherwise how are you going to customize development for each individual shot?

    It is still a very useful process (think of most of Karsh's iconic work), but it isn't necessary - time and temperature in a light tight tank will work just peachy.
    It's sometimes necessary...

    I shot a third of a roll of 35mm TMAX 100 under difficult conditions. It was the fastest film I had on hand when I went to shoot a scene on a stage from the audience. No meter because both my spotmeters were temporarily out of commission. Even if I guessed right, I had to shoot at 1/60th second or higher anyway.

    So I am going to develop by inspection. (I have an IR viewer). After the normal time, I'll pull the roll out and snip where concert ends and normal photography begins, then I'll fix the normal stuff and continue development on the thin stuff until I feel I have gotten everything possible.

  7. #47

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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    Thanks Matt and Bill

    Yea I just feel like it should be done, you can always cut 120 as it is developing and you can discern the lines, then stop some as they are ready while keeping others developing longer.

    But I was just thinking that it would just be fun to see it appear, and that I should just do it BECAUSE its ortho.

    But MOSTLY the ortho I have frozen is OLD so I don't know when to stop it, so being able to see it develop and stop it when necessary would be a great advantage.

    Thanks guys, good info all around.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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  8. #48

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    If you are going to drum scan and print digitally, why not use Portra 160? You can then apply colour filters digitally, instead of having to mount them on the lens and lose light.

    If you have to use black and white, then either Acros 100 or TMax 100 are great films with very fine grain, developed in Xtol or TMax developer. I have a buddy that shoots with the SWC, and he uses Acros developed in Caffenol. His results are really good, but I have only seen them as scans, not as 40" prints. As far as an experimental entry fee, that won't set you back much, as Acros is the most affordable 120 film, and Caffenol is very easy to make and the ingredients are mostly in your kitchen. Give it a go with three rolls or so, then decide whether it works for you or not.

    If you were going for darkroom prints, then I would have recommended TMax 100, as it is slightly easier to print with good highlights. Off-topic, I know, but I have seen fine 40" darkroom prints from 35 mm TriX developed in D76. I am not equipped to print that large, but I do print from TriX to 16", and the grain doesn't bother me in the least. It is the image that determines whether the grain is helpful or not. If you get a bit of grain at 40" with whatever film you use, it is not the end of the world, provided the image itself is really good.

  9. #49

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    Rollei PAN 25, Rodinal 1:100 stand developing

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I thought the reason no one mentioned 25 ASA films was because they are all discontinued? I thought Pan F+ 50ASA was the slowest film still in production, sure you can get other films for a while from stock but inevitably they are going to run out...
    Rollei PAN 25 is still available. This is really fine grain stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by fatso View Post
    I developed my roll of Efke 25 with Rodinol 1:50 as suggested by Роберт and made some pretty good negatives and thanked him - I didn't have that much else to add
    Try one hour stand developing with Rodinal ≈1:100 and Acros ISO 100, Efke 25, Rollei Pan 25, and Ilford PAN F+. All come out great. I like Efke and Rollei PAN but because of price I buy a lot of Acros 100. I haven't experimented much with Kodak TMAX. You can be pretty cavalier with Rodinal storage and it will last forever at full strength. You don't have to mix up and use liters of it. It is dirt cheap. For one hour stand developing I use 4 mL of Rodinal per a roll of 120 or 35mm. I put the 4 mL of Rodinal in whatever volume of distilled water is appropriate for what I'm developing. The beauty of it is you can develop Efke and Acros in the same tank at the same time. The dilution and time are the same for everything. I invert the tank very gently for 30 seconds at the beginning and then I just leave it alone for an hour. I use a water stop bath and then fix. Give it a try. Allegedly minimizing the agitation helps to reduce grain.

    I did not have good results with this technique and 400 ISO film. 100 ISO or slower is beautiful with Rodinal stand.

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    If you are going to drum scan and print digitally, why not use Portra 160? You can then apply colour filters digitally, instead of having to mount them on the lens and lose light.
    Oh, no. No, no, no. Wow. No. As Sirius Glass already mentioned if you use any kind of filter to cut through haze you cannot accomplish that in photoshop. I use deep red filters (3 stops compensation) more often than you would think with landscapes and those things slice through distant haze. I also use deep red filters for portraits of light skinned people in bright sunlight. It makes their skin look flawless. I've seen "experts" make those kinds of statements a truly disturbing amount of times. It really makes me wonder if they ever use filters for B&W photography and compare the results. The effect isn't subtle.

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