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  1. #51
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    If you are going to drum scan and print digitally, why not use Portra 160? You can then apply colour filters digitally, instead of having to mount them on the lens and lose light.
    Actually NOT. If the photograph is taken with distant haze due to ultraviolet light, a UV filter or Sunlight filter will reduce the haze. If a UV filter or Sunlight filter was not used, no analog or digital process will remove the haze. The light loss due to a UV filter or Sunlight filter is insignificant.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #52

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    Rollei PAN 25, Rodinal 1:100 stand developing

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I thought the reason no one mentioned 25 ASA films was because they are all discontinued? I thought Pan F+ 50ASA was the slowest film still in production, sure you can get other films for a while from stock but inevitably they are going to run out...
    Rollei PAN 25 is still available. This is really fine grain stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by fatso View Post
    I developed my roll of Efke 25 with Rodinol 1:50 as suggested by Роберт and made some pretty good negatives and thanked him - I didn't have that much else to add
    Try one hour stand developing with Rodinal ≈1:100 and Acros ISO 100, Efke 25, Rollei Pan 25, and Ilford PAN F+. All come out great. I like Efke and Rollei PAN but because of price I buy a lot of Acros 100. I haven't experimented much with Kodak TMAX. You can be pretty cavalier with Rodinal storage and it will last forever at full strength. You don't have to mix up and use liters of it. It is dirt cheap. For one hour stand developing I use 4 mL of Rodinal per a roll of 120 or 35mm. I put the 4 mL of Rodinal in whatever volume of distilled water is appropriate for what I'm developing. The beauty of it is you can develop Efke and Acros in the same tank at the same time. The dilution and time are the same for everything. I invert the tank very gently for 30 seconds at the beginning and then I just leave it alone for an hour. I use a water stop bath and then fix. Give it a try. Allegedly minimizing the agitation helps to reduce grain.

    I did not have good results with this technique and 400 ISO film. 100 ISO or slower is beautiful with Rodinal stand.

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    If you are going to drum scan and print digitally, why not use Portra 160? You can then apply colour filters digitally, instead of having to mount them on the lens and lose light.
    Oh, no. No, no, no. Wow. No. As Sirius Glass already mentioned if you use any kind of filter to cut through haze you cannot accomplish that in photoshop. I use deep red filters (3 stops compensation) more often than you would think with landscapes and those things slice through distant haze. I also use deep red filters for portraits of light skinned people in bright sunlight. It makes their skin look flawless. I've seen "experts" make those kinds of statements a truly disturbing amount of times. It really makes me wonder if they ever use filters for B&W photography and compare the results. The effect isn't subtle.

  4. #54
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

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    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

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  5. #55
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    ...
    Which comment are you grumbling about? LOL


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Actually NOT. If the photograph is taken with distant haze due to ultraviolet light, a UV filter or Sunlight filter will reduce the haze. If a UV filter or Sunlight filter was not used, no analog or digital process will remove the haze. The light loss due to a UV filter or Sunlight filter is insignificant.
    Point taken, and I agree. I was more referring to selective filtration of normally lit scenes - should have been more specific in my response. Although I haven't tried it, I cannot see why one couldn't use any filter one likes with colour negative film, if the output is intended to be scanned and digitally converted to monochrome. Loss of one colour channel or two may of course increase the grain - has someone tried this to be able to comment?

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear Stone,

    PAN F + is a 'traditional' film, I have seen references to 'hybrid' films, no such film exists.... T.Max / DELTA Professional etc are CCG controlled crystal growth films.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology LImited :
    Hello Simon,

    due to Robert Shanebrook's excellent book "Making Kodak Film" the current T-Max 400 (TMY-2) is such a film with both classic cubic (3D) and CCG (T-Grain) crystals.
    On page 7 there is a cross section picture of the film where this is very good explained and visible.
    I quote the text next to the picture:
    ".....The top, fast emulsion is made of flat, platelet, tabular grains (T-GRAIN).
    Below this layer there is a layer containing slower, 3-dimensional (3D), nearly spherical grains......"

    Best regards,
    Henning

  8. #58

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    Dear Henning,

    I do see what you mean, but the underlayer does not seem to be a 'traditional' or 'random' cubic type of silver grain.


    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  9. #59
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    As you can see you are getting many opinions. The interesting thing is that most of them are valid recommendations, brought about by the experience and investment of that particular person.

    Here's what I would recommend- pick a well known film that seems to offer what you want, one from Ilford for example, and use a popular developer that doesn't have any special character when used normally. Get to know the combination inside out. Once you put in the time you will be able to do some pretty impressive things.

    There is no magic bullet, just normal bullets to put in a magic gun. The magic gun is you, if you are willing.

    There is no other way.

  10. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear Henning,

    I do see what you mean, but the underlayer does not seem to be a 'traditional' or 'random' cubic type of silver grain.


    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
    Hello Simon,

    in the cross section picture there is (under the overcoat) on top the (I quote) "Fast Emulsion Layer, Tabular Grains".
    And under this layer the "Slow Emulsion Layer, 3 Dimensional Grains".

    The next page (9) there is also a cross section picture of Tri-X: And the 3 Dimensional Grains in the layers there look similar in shape compared to the 3D Grains in the TMY-2.

    So both from the text in the book, and both cross section pictures it looks like TMY-2 has both traditional and T-Grain crystals.
    Maybe Robert and Ron can help us here, I will ask them.

    Best regards,
    Henning

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