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  1. #51
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    ...
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
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  2. #52

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    Recommendation needed - 'best' B&W roll film/developer combo :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    ...
    Which comment are you grumbling about? LOL


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Actually NOT. If the photograph is taken with distant haze due to ultraviolet light, a UV filter or Sunlight filter will reduce the haze. If a UV filter or Sunlight filter was not used, no analog or digital process will remove the haze. The light loss due to a UV filter or Sunlight filter is insignificant.
    Point taken, and I agree. I was more referring to selective filtration of normally lit scenes - should have been more specific in my response. Although I haven't tried it, I cannot see why one couldn't use any filter one likes with colour negative film, if the output is intended to be scanned and digitally converted to monochrome. Loss of one colour channel or two may of course increase the grain - has someone tried this to be able to comment?

  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear Stone,

    PAN F + is a 'traditional' film, I have seen references to 'hybrid' films, no such film exists.... T.Max / DELTA Professional etc are CCG controlled crystal growth films.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology LImited :
    Hello Simon,

    due to Robert Shanebrook's excellent book "Making Kodak Film" the current T-Max 400 (TMY-2) is such a film with both classic cubic (3D) and CCG (T-Grain) crystals.
    On page 7 there is a cross section picture of the film where this is very good explained and visible.
    I quote the text next to the picture:
    ".....The top, fast emulsion is made of flat, platelet, tabular grains (T-GRAIN).
    Below this layer there is a layer containing slower, 3-dimensional (3D), nearly spherical grains......"

    Best regards,
    Henning

  5. #55

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    Dear Henning,

    I do see what you mean, but the underlayer does not seem to be a 'traditional' or 'random' cubic type of silver grain.


    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  6. #56
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    As you can see you are getting many opinions. The interesting thing is that most of them are valid recommendations, brought about by the experience and investment of that particular person.

    Here's what I would recommend- pick a well known film that seems to offer what you want, one from Ilford for example, and use a popular developer that doesn't have any special character when used normally. Get to know the combination inside out. Once you put in the time you will be able to do some pretty impressive things.

    There is no magic bullet, just normal bullets to put in a magic gun. The magic gun is you, if you are willing.

    There is no other way.
    That's just, like, my opinion, man...

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear Henning,

    I do see what you mean, but the underlayer does not seem to be a 'traditional' or 'random' cubic type of silver grain.


    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
    Hello Simon,

    in the cross section picture there is (under the overcoat) on top the (I quote) "Fast Emulsion Layer, Tabular Grains".
    And under this layer the "Slow Emulsion Layer, 3 Dimensional Grains".

    The next page (9) there is also a cross section picture of Tri-X: And the 3 Dimensional Grains in the layers there look similar in shape compared to the 3D Grains in the TMY-2.

    So both from the text in the book, and both cross section pictures it looks like TMY-2 has both traditional and T-Grain crystals.
    Maybe Robert and Ron can help us here, I will ask them.

    Best regards,
    Henning

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by fatso View Post
    I shoot medium format rollfilm mostly with a SWC, and looking back at some of my old negatives (Ilford Delta 100/D76) they seem a bit grainy...
    Paul I rattled off some emulsions and developing techniques that I like but for whatever reason I didn't see the part of your post about Delta 100/D76. I have not used Delta 100 recently and I can't even remember the last time I used D76. So I can't make any comparisons between them and anything else. Just wanted to state that in the interest of full disclosure.

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henning Serger View Post
    Hello Simon,

    in the cross section picture there is (under the overcoat) on top the (I quote) "Fast Emulsion Layer, Tabular Grains".
    And under this layer the "Slow Emulsion Layer, 3 Dimensional Grains".

    The next page (9) there is also a cross section picture of Tri-X: And the 3 Dimensional Grains in the layers there look similar in shape compared to the 3D Grains in the TMY-2.

    So both from the text in the book, and both cross section pictures it looks like TMY-2 has both traditional and T-Grain crystals.
    Maybe Robert and Ron can help us here, I will ask them.

    Best regards,
    Henning
    Hello Simon,

    the question concerning TMY-2 is answered by Robert Shanebrook. His reply to my question (Robert, thanks a lot for your quick reply!):

    "In 2007 Kodak made a change in TMY and designated it as TMY-2. The change was to replace the 3D layer with a t-grain layer. So Simon is correct that Kodak TMY-2 is all T-grain now.

    I don't know for sure but I expect there are still some color negative films with 3Ds and T-grains. "


    O.k., so now we know the source of the confusion: I thought the cross section picture in his book is the current T-Max 400 (TMY-2), but it is indeed the former TMY. Very good to know.

    That explains the finer grain and higher resolution of TMY-2 compared to TMY, as well.

    Thank you and Robert,
    and best regards,
    Henning

  10. #60
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    To repeat some previous comments made in the color forum, I believe that you will find that Kodak Ektar 100, and the Vision family of Motion Picture films use a combined t-grain and 3D (cubic) emulsion. This was announced by Kodak at the introduction of these products.

    You will find this information at: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4046/e4046.pdf

    PE

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