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  1. #11
    pierods's Avatar
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    markbarendt: thanks!

    ralphlambrecht: thanks, but I am pretty certain that the weather was overcast

  2. #12

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    I would use the 6 minute processing time, and boost contrast (if necessary) in printing using variable contrast filters on multigrade paper.

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    then the 9 minutes might be a good start, just as you thought.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
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    So yesterday I developed a roll that I shot last week with a few shots under an overcast sky in Oregon. (Delta 400, not Tri-X but, so what? Same theory applies.)

    I metered using an equivalent method to yours pierods. (Incident metering, what I did, and pegging via a known tone, your grey card/subject's face in this case.) We both should have ended up at essentially the same camera setting. Easily within 1/2-stop.

    I developed the film normally, no extra development time. (Because I had shots on the roll that were taken under different conditions, not just under overcast)

    Did the proof print last evening, the "overcast" shots fell nicely "straight" onto my VC paper at grade 2. No adjustment required.

    This is the norm in my world, with my subjects and sensibility. It took me a long time to learn that lesson and stop chasing other people's sensibilities.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 11-27-2012 at 08:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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