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  1. #31
    sly
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    I have seen someone use a pop-up flash straight into the face of a newborn only minutes old from less than a foot away. Anyone would find that distressing, even more so a baby just arrived from the dim of the womb. Of course, those of us serious about photography wouldn't do such a thing - the resulting photo would be dreadful. If family members have point and shoot cameras with flashes that can't be turned off (or they don't know how to turn off) I ask them to avoid flashing straight into the baby's face, and concentrate on profiles.
    My previous advice is for anyone photographing during labour, the actual birth, and the immediate postpartum. Once things have settled, the medical personnel have cleared out, and the initial excitement eased off a bit, then get out the MF, the tripod, the bounce flash..... whatever. It might be a couple of hours after the birth, or it might be the next day.
    Once home life will be busy - grab any opportunity to take photos of the babies. I once spent 3 hours with a family with twins a few days old trying to get a photo of the 2 babies cuddled together. Didn't happen. What did happen? Diaper changes, crying, breastfeeding, repeat, repeat. It was the wrong 3 hours. I took photos, of course, but not the cuddly one the parents hoped for. That had to wait for another session. As a family member you will have more chances - if it doesn't work out one day, try another.

    Quickie scan of one of my photos:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by sly; 11-25-2012 at 08:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    BABY BURRITO.

    I remember that time. I miss it.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  3. #33

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    Maternity ward / Hospital Film & Developer Advice Needed?

    Hi. I'm a doctor from Brazil. Sorry if my English is poor.
    I have some advices about this question. I did photos of my sister-in-law at maternyard. I used a digital with speeds ranging 1/200-1/60 and apertures 5.6 to 11. The iso was 800 to 3200. I was expecting much less light, but the lights from the top (we call this "focus lighting") over the surgical field and the lights of the baby's warmer are very strong, so using delta 3200 rated 1600-3200 are very good choices.
    Another advice is about medical personnel: while in OR you are a stranger doing strange things. Probably you will have very limited time and space for doing your pictures. Dont touch anything, dont speak loud and dont use flashes. Flashlights are not allowed here in brazil in OR because surgeons dont like all that lights popping at room.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  4. #34
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luizjorgemn View Post
    Hi. I'm a doctor from Brazil. Sorry if my English is poor.
    I have some advices about this question. I did photos of my sister-in-law at maternyard. I used a digital with speeds ranging 1/200-1/60 and apertures 5.6 to 11. The iso was 800 to 3200. I was expecting much less light, but the lights from the top (we call this "focus lighting") over the surgical field and the lights of the baby's warmer are very strong, so using delta 3200 rated 1600-3200 are very good choices.
    Another advice is about medical personnel: while in OR you are a stranger doing strange things. Probably you will have very limited time and space for doing your pictures. Dont touch anything, dont speak loud and dont use flashes. Flashlights are not allowed here in brazil in OR because surgeons dont like all that lights popping at room.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Thank you, that advice and those reasons make sense.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #35

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    A couple of comments to add, especially to the input from the midwife and doctor. My experience in American hospitals is that midwives are much more amenable to photography than tend to be doctors and nurses. Also, things can go "wrong" real fast with some pregnancies and deliveries... so be prepared to be flexible, including not being allowed to photograph during delivery. Hopefully all goes well for mom, baby, and photographer, though

  6. #36
    Ricus.stormfire's Avatar
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    If I may add to this thread for future dads, be prepared to have very shaky hands..... I think I must have only gotten one shot on the roll which didn't have massive amounts of camera shake when my son was born yesterday....a monopod might have helped.

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