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  1. #11
    Pfiltz's Avatar
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    Thanks folks... I actually threw 2 of my Fiber prints back into a water bath, then just placed them out flat on a paper towel. When they really felt kind of dry, I placed them in a Vogue mag. with other magazines on top of it. I took them out yesterday, and they were really looking good.

    I hear several folks talk about screens. Why screens? Is it because of the small pockets of air coming through it, that makes it dry uniformly? Someone mentioned to me about a print dryer like this too.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Portagraph-R...item2a26250d7a

  2. #12

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    The print dryer link above is exactly the traditional device for drying fibre-based paper. That one is relatively small (for 12" wide paper) but would do a great job, assuming that it is in working condition as the ad says.

    A simple way (but not the fastest) to get flat fibre-based prints is to tape the damp paper, picture side outwards, to a piece of glass or heavy perspex. Use watercolour tape, a cheap product for fixing damp watercolour paper during drying and stretching, prior to use. When it is air-dry it will be pretty much flat, then cutting off the thin border where you have placed the tape will relax the print - and let it stay pretty flat during changing humidity in the future too.

  3. #13

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    Your trick with the magazine is essentially the same as using a blotter, except that a blotter won't transfer ink to your print.
    Print dryers work, but the cloth aprons will contaminate your prints if (prior) prints have inadequate washing. If you keep the apron clean, they can be handy.
    I use drying screens because for my DR it's the easiest way to have drying prints out of the way. After they're dry on the screen, I put them in a blotter under a stack of books, or else in my wife's book press to get them flat.
    Some papers do better than others, Ilford MG curls a lot compared to some of the Eastern European papers IME.

  4. #14
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    Thanks folks... I'll look into using screens as well. I'm currently using some Ilford MGIV paper, which goes nuts when it dry's...

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Wooden frames can be made from pre-primed trim from a home imporvement store, if youa re not up to the task of cutting larger pieces of wood down to size.

    I found the pre packaged nylon screen meant to repair a sliding pation door was the cheapest screen I could buy, nearly half the price of the bulk stuff cut to size. Go figure.

    One night, with some trim nails, and a staple gun was how my first screens went together.

    After that me anf FB got along much better. Especially some old single weight Kodabromide graded stuff I had a large stash of at one time.
    my real name, imagine that.

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