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Thread: Too warm...???

  1. #1

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    Too warm...???

    I am just starting to develop my own BW films. It is very satisfying to have total controls of the entire development process. What do you think of these 3 shots here? Do you think the water temperature may have been too warm or too cold? These are developed using Kodak d76 at 68f, supposedly. I was having issues keeping the temp constant during the rinsing part. I was following the instructions from here.
    http://www.blackandwhitefineart.net/bwfilmdev/
    Mamiya c330, sekor 65mm with a yellow filter. Tmax 400. Scanned by Canon 9000f.






    This shot was from another roll tmax400 and D76 and pushed by 2 tops.


  2. #2

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    Well....

    I think the first image was developed 2 degrees C too warm
    The second one was about right....
    The last one I think is .....

    Heck, you can't tell if the temp was wrong by just looking at prints! I think they all look wonderful. The high contrast of the first image really works well where as it didn't do so well with the last. But that's just my preference. You could very well say, "but I meant to do that" and you'll be fine... hehe.

    Seriously, if the temp was warmer, you shorten the dev time. If the temp was cooler, you lengthen, to get the same result. It's combination of both that determines the level of development which affects contrast. (and agitation, too)

    All that is kind of lost if you are scanning though.

    I think you did very well here.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3
    sly
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    Get your DEVELOPER to the right temp. It may be ideal to have all your chemicals and wash water at exactly the same temperature, but don't fuss too much if it isn't. My darkroom is an outbuilding. I only have cold running water. I don't try to warm it up, I just wash for longer. I don't bother warming or cooling my fix or stop either, unless it is unusually hot or cold.
    Your images look great for a first try at developing. Congratulations!

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I too think these look good.

    If you can, try to get your room temperature to something close to 68F/20C. Then use chemistry that has been allowed to come to room temperature.

    If you are a couple of degrees off of 68F/20C, adjust the development time according to what the manufacturer recommends. You can then adjust the wash water time to be close to room temperature - a couple of degrees different won't matter a lot.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5

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    having the developer the right temp is the most critical because that controls the chemical reaction -- too warm, too much reaction and so on.

    You want the rinse and fix to be close to avoid reticulation -- the emulsion swelling or shrinking and creating a crackly pattern on the film, but a couple-three or four or five degrees one way or the other isn't going to hurt. Big fast swings create problems.

    temp controls contrast and amount of development, but when yu develop always at 68 you eliminate one variable--there are lots more that affect those things too. Your pics look just fine.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    having the developer the right temp is the most critical because that controls the chemical reaction
    Agreed! Developer temperature is critical. Stop bath, fixer and rinse temperatures, while important, are not so critical.

    I try to hold my developer temperature to the target temperature ±1ºC. I try to keep my other temperatures as steady as I reasonably can but if they vary by ±5º over the span of a few minutes, I take steps to correct it.

    Overall, the shock of a quick temperature change, regardless of the amount, can be worse than a temperature change that varies by several degrees over the span of five or ten minutes.

    In the past, I have had accidents where I set my film down to rinse under the faucet then left the room. When I came back to check, I found that the water was almost ten degrees warmer than when I started. "Oh $hit," I thought! But that change took place over ten minutes or more. While not the best thing to happen, I haven't experienced any damage.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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    Thanks guys...



 

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