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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    Delta 3200 developed warm goes nuts, and I love it.

    This is full strength D76 for 18 minutes at 24C

    Attachment 60511
    yup, I like it.

    Back in the 90s I shot a lot of rock bands with Kodak Recording film pushed to something silly in DK50... they had a similar 'gritty' feel.
    Steve

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven_e007 View Post
    yup, I like it.

    Back in the 90s I shot a lot of rock bands with Kodak Recording film pushed to something silly in DK50... they had a similar 'gritty' feel.
    The nice thing is that D3200 is also extremely sharp when you want it to be. I shoot a lot of it, and even through the grain, the prints are extraordinarily detailed. I've been able to resolve the thread pattern in dress shirts under the grain of D3200, processed this same way. That example was shot at a lower speed on a moving subway though, so shake destroyed a lot of the subtle detail.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    The nice thing is that D3200 is also extremely sharp when you want it to be. I shoot a lot of it, and even through the grain, the prints are extraordinarily detailed. I've been able to resolve the thread pattern in dress shirts under the grain of D3200, processed this same way. That example was shot at a lower speed on a moving subway though, so shake destroyed a lot of the subtle detail.
    Yes, I get the impression it is faster and much finer grained than Kodak Recording film - but then that is what you expect comparing a delta grain emulsion to an old 'conventional' film.

    The trick is getting these really good ultra modern films to to behave like older emulsions when we want them to. I'm sure there is a lot moe scope for experimentation, here...
    Steve

  4. #14
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    Are you familiar with Lith printing? There is grain in the paper, you just need to bring it out (clump it together) during development.
    This is a print from a Delta 100 4x5 negative. The grain you see is from the paper:

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkL View Post
    I’m sure the economics of film production are complex and sales are down, but if a manufacturer were able to offer an old school really grainy film, I suspect it would be very popular. Film grain has mostly evolved to be smoother and smoother over the years, but many of us would absolutely love availability of just the opposite. I know it’s possible to get somewhat more visible grain by using high speed films, enlarging small negatives, using condensers, etc… But I’m talking about very apparent obscenely coarse large grain without jumping through hoops to get it (especially with sheet film).

    I’m just a dummy who points cameras at things and am sure Ilford has already thought of this. I’m just surprised no one has done it. I’ve heard more than once that film grain is unique and not well duplicated digitally, and that’s why some people use film, and why more people might start buying it!

    Just part of my naïve wish list. I know I’d buy a boat load of it!
    hi markl

    you can get grain out of nearly any film, even tab-grain films like 2oocreativ, tmax and delta films
    just buy using a different development strategy. i am not sure what developer you use, but
    if you use a more active developer ( maybe ) than what you are using, change your development temperature,
    maybe change how you shoot your film, you can get beautiful grain.

    i use pretty much the same developer and development strategy for most of the film i expose.
    usually i over develop by a stop or a few, and i stand develop in a strong brew of caffenol and a few cc's of print developer

    of course this sort of thing isn't meant for everyone or ... but it works flawlessly in getting grain and stain on nearly everything i shoot, even 4x5 and 5x7 film ...

    your actual mileage may vary from factory specifications of course ..
    john
    ask me how ..

  6. #16

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    Ilford SFX is another good choice for grain, especially in 35. Not as much as the Delta 3200, but much more than the usual from fp4/hp5/Tri-X

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    Delta 3200 developed warm goes nuts, and I love it.

    This is full strength D76 for 18 minutes at 24C

    Attachment 60511
    I like this. Do you follow a normalish agitation pattern?
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

  8. #18

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    Foma 400 in 35mm is the grainiest current film that I know of.

  9. #19
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    Wow great info as usual on APUG. And nice grainy images posted. Chris Lange: full strength D76 for 18 minutes at 24C? That must've been about like printing through an asphalt shingle? Looks great though!

    Regarding lith, I'm familiar with it but realize that most of the grain will be in the lower tones, with the upper tones being smaller grained (with exeptions of course). This is great in its own right, but pretty paper dependent.

    I wish Delta 3200 were available in sheet film. It used to be right? In my magic little world Ilford would do annual special order runs

    With Ilford putting out the new Art 300 paper I was hoping they might put out a companion Art FILM (in sheets)!

    Thanks everybody,
    Mark

  10. #20

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    Two other possibilities are the use of a grain mask and reticulation.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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