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  1. #11

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    This phosphorescent paint does a good job of reconditioning the hands and markings on Graylab timers.
    It's brighter and glows longer than the original material.

    http://www.porters.com/rexton-hi-qua...blue-1-oz.html

  2. #12

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    Ian - actually I kind of like it the worn out way it is - dim but bright enough to see. If anything it could reduce the risk of fogging.

    Some experiments are definitely in order... Thanks for the feedback everyone.

  3. #13
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Never had a problem with my Gra-Lab but I still pull a flap of black duvetyne down over the face when I have film out in the darkroom.

    I know that, for short periods of time, it won't make a difference unless you have super high-speed film but, for the ease and simplicity of covering the clock, it's good insurance.

    Yes, like others, I have forgotten to cover the clock and have handled film with no ill effects.

    My clock is nearly ten feet away from the bench where I handle film and three or four feet away from where I develop prints. Have not had a problem, yet.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #14
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Even though it goes against common wisdom and experience, I've removed (acetone) the glowing numerals from both of my Gra-Lab timers.

    When I built my darkroom I made the decision to make it honest-to-goodness dark. Meaning, a complete absence of light. Meaning, I can stand in there for hours and still not see a single photon. No glow tapes. No LED indicators. No lighted switches. No light leaks. Nothing. The door frame was selected because it hermetically seals like a fridge. The counters all have generously rounded corners to prevent injury. And I can take my sweet time loading or unloading 8x10 holders with hundreds of dollars worth of sheet film laying about and never have to worry at all.

    Call it sensory-depravation insanity-inducing dark.

    Works for me...



    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  5. #15

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    I got one back in 1971. I don't use it much, but it sits on the bench near the enlargers and about five feet away from where I load film. I've never had any problem with fogging because of it, even with 3200 speed film. I guess if I laid a sheet of film on top of it for a few seconds, it would get exposed, but at several feet there doesn't appear to be a problem.

  6. #16

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    I never had problems tray developing paper 3 feet away from my venerable Gralab 300 timer which I bought new in 1969.
    But recently started large format, and while loading/unloading film in 4x5 holders or developing 4x5 sheet film in open trays, the Gralab300 is put it away so as not to risk fogging the film.

  7. #17
    Rafal Lukawiecki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    All these years I've developed sheet film without a visible timer, just a metronome and counting the minutes in my head!! Talk about adding stress to the process: "wait was I at 6 minutes or 7 minutes". It's like counting long rests when playing music. Stop concentrating for a few seconds and you're in trouble.
    Michael, I've lost the count of how many times I've lost the count. Funnily enough, I don't think I was actually ever off in my counting, but the stress and the darkness-induced self-doubt were not worth it. I bought this little process timer: http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/...essmaster.html

    It comes with a foot switch, and it beeps to tell me when to agitate, and when I am 10 secs from the end of a stage in a process sequence. For film processing, I turn it upside down, so I work by sound only. For paper, it seems quite safe. As an extra, it comes with a temperature probe, which adjusts the "speed" of the passage of time as a function of deviation of the temperature from the aim of 68F. You may have seen John Sexton use a similar device when processing paper in developer. This one is more customisable than the no-longer-made one that John has, and it allows a choice of 4% and 8% temp rate adjustments.

    Stress no more.
    Rafal Lukawiecki
    See rafal.net | Read rafal.net/articles

  8. #18

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    These will absolutely, positively, unequivocally fog certain films given too close proximity or long enough tray time, just as will LED timers. Maybe you think they have no effect, but your shadow
    values might well be off because of it, or some day you'll be experiementing with a different film or
    developer and wonder what went wrong. I put timers under the sink, and anywhere else angle them
    so the film or paper can never actually "see" them. Definition of a darkroom = DARK.

  9. #19
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Definition of a darkroom = DARK.
    "Dark" is a binary condition. As Yoda said, it either is, or it is not. There is no try...



    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  10. #20
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I have never had a problem with a Gra-Lab timer fogging paper.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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