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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Phosphorescent markers on these timers will fog faster pan films and color paper. The timers should be kept at least 4 feet (1,1 meter) away from any film or pan paper.

    PE

  2. #22
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Anecdotally, my A-R-T (like Time-O-Lite) and GraLab timers do not fog my film. But they are 4 feet away.

    Sometimes when I set the GraLab the safelight comes on, which isn't exactly what I wanted. When that happens, I abort developing and move the film to fix. (Usually happens late in development anyway just setting the time for fix).

  3. #23
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Bill;

    You know that you can go into a stop or running water rinse and then fix without setting the time. Wait until you turn the lights on! I count off 1' for stop and 1' for the fix, then set the fix clock 1' shy.

    PE

  4. #24

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    A baffle is easy to construct to shade your film-developing area.

    Unless you count seconds with a metronome, like Micheal R does (and I do as well in my European darkroom), you need to see something, either the phosphorescent hands of your GrayLab or the red LEDs on my Zone VI Compensating Developing Timer. Just keep it as far away from the film as practical and build yourself a baffle out of cardboard, etc. to shade the work area. You could even put the timer deep inside a box as long as you could still see the hands.

    Best,

    Doremus

    www.DoremusScudder.com

  5. #25
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian C View Post
    I The fastest sheet film I use is ASA 320 or ASA 400 and is developed in the same trays as papers. I don’t see any fogging effect on these relatively fast films, which are likely more light sensitive than the papers.
    much more sensitive! paper as an iso of about 3
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #26
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    much more sensitive! paper as an iso of about 3
    Ah, but the consequence of fogging film... is that you have to print through and possibly alter contrast in printing.

    The consequence of a fogged print... is a piece of paper in the trash.

  7. #27
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Bill;

    You know that you can go into a stop or running water rinse and then fix without setting the time. Wait until you turn the lights on! I count off 1' for stop and 1' for the fix, then set the fix clock 1' shy.

    PE
    I've compensated for this problem a couple different ways... As you suggest, starting the timer after the film is in the fix... or sometimes setting the fix timer to 20 minutes before starting and making sure the safelight isn't switched on. (I also have to ask myself why I plug the safelight into the "enlarger" socket - another mistake with potentially devastating consequences)...

    I think I will dedicate a wall socket for the safelight. (I don't "need" the light table plugged in all the time).

  8. #28
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    I have one. It never even occurred to me to think it might fog black and white paper. It sits right behind the trays, maybe 2' away if that, and I've never had a problem. (I've also not developed Panalure in this darkroom - I bought some that is in my freezer now, and that's a good reminder; I will move it farther away when I do.) I've never had a problem with fogging.

    I do turn it around facing the wall when I load sheet film holders or film developing tanks. If I get back into RA4 I will at least move it farther away, and probably arrange some kind of baffle as well, though I do have a timer with no illumination that can be pre-set, the start button hit in the dark, and will beep when the time is up.

    I think it's false that "dark" is a dichotomy, at least most of the time. There is likely to be SOME light present from SOMEWHERE. Any sensitized material will have some threshhold below which it will not respond at all, and a higher level at which response will be slow enough as to not matter for usual purposes. I imagine my safelights might fog paper if I left it out under them for an hour, but I don't. I test for 10 minutes, which is about twice as long as the paper is normally exposed to them.

  9. #29
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    I've compensated for this problem a couple different ways... As you suggest, starting the timer after the film is in the fix... or sometimes setting the fix timer to 20 minutes before starting and making sure the safelight isn't switched on. (I also have to ask myself why I plug the safelight into the "enlarger" socket - another mistake with potentially devastating consequences)...

    I think I will dedicate a wall socket for the safelight. (I don't "need" the light table plugged in all the time).
    My enlarge came with a timer that I plug the safelight into. I can turn the safelight off. My wet darkroom is in another room and I can use the Gra-Lab there if needed. I use the Gra-Lab for timing film processing with the Jobo.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I guess if I laid a sheet of film on top of it for a few seconds, it would get exposed, but at several feet there doesn't appear to be a problem.
    I actually did just that with a sheet of 4x5 film that had been in the developer a few minutes. I was developing with IR goggles and noticed the sheet was blank. I wust have forgot to pull the darks slide. For amusement I slapped the sheet emulsion side onto the Gralab timer for about 3 to 5 seconds, thinking the numbers wound print. However the sheet stayed perfectly clear. I have heard that film is less light sensitive after it is in the developer which is counter intuitive but people do develop by inspection after all.
    f/22 and be there.

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