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  1. #31

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    Don't all modern films have an anti-halation layer? They don't all have this pink tinge after processing though.

  2. #32
    sly
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    Hypo - fixer
    Hypo clear - helps get rid of the fixer, less wash time needed
    Hypocheck - a drop in the fixer lets you know if it's time to dump it and make fresh.

  3. #33
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    Slightly pink hue?

    Quote Originally Posted by sly View Post
    Hypo - fixer
    Hypo clear - helps get rid of the fixer, less wash time needed
    Hypocheck - a drop in the fixer lets you know if it's time to dump it and make fresh.
    Gotcha, thanks! Photography terms seem to change as processes change yet old names still stick around and since I'm relatively new (in terms of the processing side) the old terms sometimes get confused.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sly View Post
    Hypo - fixer
    Hypo clear - helps get rid of the fixer, less wash time needed
    Hypocheck - a drop in the fixer lets you know if it's time to dump it and make fresh.
    And Hypo Eliminator - no longer used, and not the same as Hypo clear

    PS the name "Hypo" comes from an obsolete way of designating a certain type of chemical.

    What was once known as "hyposulfite of soda" is now, and more correctly, known as "sodium thiosulfate".
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #35

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    Be careful to differentiate between a "regular" fixer (Sodium Thiosulfate - often referred to as Hypo), and Rapid Fixer (Ammonium Thiosulfate). Big difference in fixing time (both film and paper) and potentially procedures particularly for paper.

    StoneNYC - Ilford has some good publications to read on processing, which you can get off the website.

  6. #36
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    Slightly pink hue?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Be careful to differentiate between a "regular" fixer (Sodium Thiosulfate - often referred to as Hypo), and Rapid Fixer (Ammonium Thiosulfate). Big difference in fixing time (both film and paper) and potentially procedures particularly for paper.

    StoneNYC - Ilford has some good publications to read on processing, which you can get off the website.
    Thanks I've been working off my iPhone for the last few months, JUST got a new computer so now I can do more research and print stuff! (Normal paper stuff not photos)

    I use ilford rapid fixer at 5 minutes for everything B&W.

    Is there such a thing as OVER fixing?


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #37

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    Regarding 5 minutes - this is fine for fresh Ilford Rapid Fixer. If you are reusing your fixer make sure to do the clearing tests to figure out if/when you need to extend time.

    Yes there is such a thing as overfixing. For film you don't have to really worry about an extra minute here and there but if you way overfix, the fixer will begin to bleach the developed silver in the negatives (you'll start to lose density - certainly you do not want this to happen to your shadows).

    For papers, it is really best to stick very close to the manufacturer's instructions (again - see Ilford publications) and follow them carefully. Not only do you want to avoid bleaching, but with fiber papers, fixing for longer than the recommended time can leads to longer wash times or other problems. Of course, underfixing is bad for all sorts of reasons.

  8. #38
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    Slightly pink hue?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Regarding 5 minutes - this is fine for fresh Ilford Rapid Fixer. If you are reusing your fixer make sure to do the clearing tests to figure out if/when you need to extend time.

    Yes there is such a thing as overfixing. For film you don't have to really worry about an extra minute here and there but if you way overfix, the fixer will begin to bleach the developed silver in the negatives (you'll start to lose density - certainly you do not want this to happen to your shadows).

    For papers, it is really best to stick very close to the manufacturer's instructions (again - see Ilford publications) and follow them carefully. Not only do you want to avoid bleaching, but with fiber papers, fixing for longer than the recommended time can leads to longer wash times or other problems. Of course, underfixing is bad for all sorts of reasons.
    Gotcha, all good info!


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    The link you sent me to shows fixer, is hypo the same as fixer?


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, unless you are talking to a urologist or a veterinarian.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #40

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    Dumb question: in a clip test, how do you see when the film turns clear? (or am I supposed to do this in a separate beaker outside the tank?)

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