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  1. #11

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    Another thing, how will the people know its meant to mean fading and its not just a very bad print? You should hang it next to a proper archival print so people can have a frame of reference. Just saying :P
    "The Medium is the Message"

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by wfarer View Post
    I'm planning a conceptual installation piece and my idea is for one wall of b&w photographs to deteriorate during the installation period of 4-6 weeks to simulate fading of memories.
    Maybe the best way of doing this is to make a series of prints that gradually get lighter and use them to replace the older print every other night ((6x7)/2=21 prints needed) or every third night ((6x7)/3=14 prints needed).

  3. #13
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Maybe a weak household bleach or diluted iodine solution (as used to disinfect) could do the trick? Iodine can even kick selenium from its bond with silver in a selenium toned print.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

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  4. #14
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I've heard of photographers in the old days giving proofs of unfixed salt prints.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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  5. #15
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    Could you just use old, exhausted fixer?

    Fresh fixer would work fairly quickly. It might be tricky to get them out of the bath soon enough for them to be "almost" permanent.

    Old fixer would take longer and, when it does work, wouldn't work as well.

    Alternately, what about diluting the fixer more than usual?
    Randy S.

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  6. #16
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Sunlight should work wonders. No glass in front of the pictures. Keep the place humid. Have people drink coffee near the pictures.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  7. #17

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    just make retina prints, in camera paper negative long exposure
    without developer and don't bother fixing
    you will have negatives and they will degrade very very fast
    behind glass, maybe less time than without museum glass.
    you can also contact print onto photopaper the same way ..
    long exposures in the sun. the image will be stained on the paper
    and VERY unstable. fixing them will turn your paper white ...

    good luck !
    john

  8. #18
    eddie's Avatar
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    I have a book (Photo Art, by Worobiec and Spence), which mentions sealing tree leaves in plastic, with a fiber print. In humid conditions, the leaves bacteria and fungi will begin to eat the gelatin, beginning the decay. According to the book, it will take a few weeks, and different leaves, different papers, and differing times will produce different effects. I don't know if this is what you have in mind, but it's worth a thought.

  9. #19
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    The Starn twins just had a show of work in Cincinnati where the work was lit by an arc light that faded the prints through intense UV over the month of display. Viewers had to wear eye protection and were offered sunscreen at the door.

    Commercially, there was a machine we printed with called a stabilizer processor. It developed the print with a concentrated developer solution, then "stabilized" the print with a second solution. It worked like a fixer, but only temporarily. Under display, it would darken to obscurity. I believe Adorama still sells this stuff, so you might be able to get some and use it in place of fixer.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

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  10. #20

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    The tricl would be to make the prints degrade on the schedule of 4 to 6 weeks. This would probably required quite a bit of experimenting to get the time right.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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