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  1. #21
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    ye, flsshing is all about finding the paper's inertiawith non-image xposureand building image exposure on top of it.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #22
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Very Cool
    I have contrast masked negatives and positives
    but this is a brilliant way of doing this.
    Overall flashing is done many ways, but Micheal I can see clearly how you do it and is something I never figured out how to do.

    Old dogs do learn new Tricks

    thanks
    Bob

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    There are several ways depending on what is required. Of course there is negative masking, but there are a few other more simple techniques I sometimes use (both require a second light source/enlarger and easel - I bought a small used Durst for $10 for this purpose so I can use filters etc):

    1. With the flashing easel set to the same size as the print, you can tape down little markers, pointers etc so you know where to position the burning cards/holes etc during the flash exposure.

    2. Make an actual scrap print, cut out the areas to be flashed, and place the print on or above the paper during the flash exposure (essentially paper plane masking). Note it is best to use RC paper for this since in addition to it being obviously easier to work with and faster to process/wash/dry, it has to be dimensionally stable paper so that "registration" at the paper plane works properly.

    3. Combine (1) and (2), burning/dodging during the flash exposure with a print that has cutouts etc.

    Diffusing paper can be used with any of these techniques to feather edges etc.

    I originally learnt about localized flashing from John Sexton's masterful use of it in many of the powerplant, Hoover Dam and space shuttle prints in his "Places of Power" series. These prints remain my reference point for how to manage extreme contrast situations without destroying local contrast.

  3. #23
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    The basic principle behind flashing is to add a small amount of exposure to the print. Small increments affect highlights more than shadows, so that small increment tends to reduce contrast. Its a very effective way to add just a hint of detail in highlights that would otherwise be blown out. I tend to use post-flashing rather than pre-flashing simply because for me its part of the process of creating the print.

    The textbooks tell you to either remove the negative from the carrier, and then give a short burst of light using the enlarger, or else use a secondary light source. There are some textbooks that talk about using a small flashlight that is masked with a bit of neutral density filter (which could be nothing more than a bit of exposed and processed film leader) that you can use to flash specific highlight areas. I've tried that - it does work, but it's tricky to get the right amount of contrast reduction and avoid creating an obvious abnormal shadow.

    The approach that I finally settled on and that works for me is to have a sheet of matte mylar drafting film (it's been around for a while!) mounted in a cardboard frame. The sheet of mylar is fairly large compared with the negatives that I normally print - about 8x10". If I conclude from an initial test print that the highlights need to be brought down a bit, I make a second print with all of the burning and dodging that I want to do. But before removing the paper from the easel, I hold the mylar sheet under the lens and make a final flashing exposure that is typically 5-20% of the base exposure. The mylar absorbs some of the light, hence the duration of the flash in my approach may be longer than in other methods. and the mylar also diffuses the light so that there is no image content. The main advantage of this approach is that it allows me to flash the print, but doesn't require that I tinker with the negative or enlarger settings in any way - so that it can be integrated into a printing sequence without affecting the time required to make the NEXT print.
    Louie

  4. #24
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    that talk about using a small flashlight that is masked with a bit of neutral density filter (which could be nothing more than a bit of exposed and processed film leader) that you can use to flash specific highlight areas. I've tried that - it does work, but it's tricky to get the right amount of contrast reduction and avoid creating an obvious abnormal shadow.


    Well I have read about this technique... I will argue that this is impossible to do... If you think about it

  5. #25
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    My understanding of flashing for film and paper is that each crystal of silver salt needs something like 3 photons to make it developable. The shadows on a negative or the highlights on a print just don't get enough to develop. They get maybe 1 or 2 photons and won't develop. Hence the toe in a film density curve. Controlled flashing will supply the necessary photons to allow those almost exposed crystals to respond to the developer. The already sensitised crystals of the rest of the image are not affected because of the low light of the flash. The technique works well with contrasty films or scenes and to enable the paper of a print to produce highlight detail that would not be available without it.

    Pat Gainer described a setup where he had a light set off to the side of the easel to supply those extra photons. He had determined the parameters by experiment.
    Last edited by Murray Kelly; 12-08-2012 at 09:23 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Murray is this in response to my post. I do understand the principle of flashing. If not the following is not directed at you.

    I would like someone explain how to locally flash within a print... Micheal R has done so quite nicely..
    I do not know how one can do so with a pinpoint flash light and any sort of filter over it.... I would be really impressed if someone could in layman terms spell out how it could be done with a mobile light source, which btw
    would be an incredible method if possible.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by Murray Kelly View Post
    My understanding of flashing for film and paper is that each crystal of silver salt needs something like 3 photons to make it developable. The shadows on a negative or the highlights on a print just don't get enough to develop. They get maybe 1 or 2 photons and won't develop. Hence the toe in a film density curve. Controlled flashing will supply the necessary photons to allow those almost exposed crystals to respond to the developer. The already sensitised crystals of the rest of the image are not affected because of the low light of the flash. The technique works well with contrasty films or scenes and to enable the paper of a print to produce highlight detail that would not be available without it.

    Pat Gainer described a setup where he had a light set off to the side of the easel to supply those extra photons. He had determined the parameters by experiment.

  7. #27

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    Using a red filter can help with selective flashing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Very Cool
    I have contrast masked negatives and positives
    but this is a brilliant way of doing this.
    Overall flashing is done many ways, but Micheal I can see clearly how you do it and is something I never figured out how to do.

    Old dogs do learn new Tricks

    thanks
    Bob

  8. #28

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    ...just realized what might seem self-evident might in fact be somewhat obscure to some so I'll elaborate...
    Rig a simple flashing source near the lens of the enlarger (a clamp on fixture with a 15w bulb and some 216 white diffusion works very nicely). Control the duration of the flash by connecting this fixture to a timer, preferably with a foot switch. Determine your flash time. Cover the enlarger lens with a red filter and use a burning-in card (white side towards the lens, black side down) to do your selective flash. It's a simple technique that works well when done properly.

  9. #29
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Ok that makes sense so you are flashing with aiming the flashlight over the hole in the card and the position is evident because you have a red filter under the lens therefore
    showing your position... this makes sense.
    Quote Originally Posted by frotog View Post
    ...just realized what might seem self-evident might in fact be somewhat obscure to some so I'll elaborate...
    Rig a simple flashing source near the lens of the enlarger (a clamp on fixture with a 15w bulb and some 216 white diffusion works very nicely). Control the duration of the flash by connecting this fixture to a timer, preferably with a foot switch. Determine your flash time. Cover the enlarger lens with a red filter and use a burning-in card (white side towards the lens, black side down) to do your selective flash. It's a simple technique that works well when done properly.

  10. #30

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    Not quite. This setup eliminates the variability problem of using a flashlight. Once again...the flashing source remains in a fixed position, preferrably close to the enlarging lens of the enlarger so as to avoid problems with parallax. You lay the selective flash down on your paper in the same manner that you would a burn - with a card with a hole in it. The red filter over the enlarger lens allows you to see where you're laying the selective flash down without exposing the image on your paper. Once set up this method is simple, effective and accurate.

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