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  1. #31

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    2. Make an actual scrap print, cut out the areas to be flashed, and place the print on or above the paper during the flash exposure (essentially paper plane masking). Note it is best to use RC paper for this since in addition to it being obviously easier to work with and faster to process/wash/dry, it has to be dimensionally stable paper so that "registration" at the paper plane works properly.
    Why not just take a sheet of opaque (or even semi-translucent) paper same size as printing paper, place in easel, and sketch areas to be cut out for pre-flashing. After cutting, then place that mask over the paper in the easel & pre-flash? Would seem to give you most of the control as above but without an intermediate development step.
    A similarly made type of mask could be created for contact printing.
    Last edited by doughowk; 12-08-2012 at 01:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  2. #32
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
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    Why not just take a sheet of opaque (or even semi-translucent) paper same size as printing paper, place in easel, and sketch areas to be cut out for pre-flashing. After cutting, then place that mask over the paper in the easel & pre-flash? Would seem to give you most of the control as above but without an intermediate development step.
    This is the way I have been doing it for years. I use frosted mylar as it transfers no texture onto the print. I don't cut the mylar at all. Instead, areas that will not receive any flashing are painted in with red paint directly on the mylar. I also dodge/burn this way. To diffuse the light from the enlarger even more, I place a think piece of white plexi under the lens. Most effective.

  3. #33
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Good techniques

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew O'Neill View Post
    This is the way I have been doing it for years. I use frosted mylar as it transfers no texture onto the print. I don't cut the mylar at all. Instead, areas that will not receive any flashing are painted in with red paint directly on the mylar. I also dodge/burn this way. To diffuse the light from the enlarger even more, I place a think piece of white plexi under the lens. Most effective.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk View Post
    Why not just take a sheet of opaque (or even semi-translucent) paper same size as printing paper, place in easel, and sketch areas to be cut out for pre-flashing. After cutting, then place that mask over the paper in the easel & pre-flash? Would seem to give you most of the control as above but without an intermediate development step.
    A similarly made type of mask could be created for contact printing.
    It's the same thing in the end. I just prefer using a print because I'm often dealing with complex and/or small shapes with relatively hard edges so I find I can get more accuracy cutting out of the print than tracing/sketching a projected image. So in my case it doesn't take much longer to make an RC print.

    There are lots of ways to personalize and customize these techniques to tailor them to the image, the preferences of the worker, the materials and equipment available, etc. Whatever works!

  5. #35
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    think,this is an example of what michael was talking about.
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    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
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  6. #36
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I wish I knew Michael's method when I printed Monks Heaven and Hell series.

    I made rc paper prints to size as he suggested and cut out complex skys around ships in the bangledesh shipbreaking yards... this method of flashing would have saved me
    hours of grief as I was printing with a grade 4 filter and the contrast was tough to handle and burning five or six stops is very hard to maintain.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    It's the same thing in the end. I just prefer using a print because I'm often dealing with complex and/or small shapes with relatively hard edges so I find I can get more accuracy cutting out of the print than tracing/sketching a projected image. So in my case it doesn't take much longer to make an RC print.

    There are lots of ways to personalize and customize these techniques to tailor them to the image, the preferences of the worker, the materials and equipment available, etc. Whatever works!

  7. #37

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    Since a proper flash exposure does not add any density to the print itself, a general flash to the entire sheet of paper should in most cases be sufficient in bringing in highlights without having much of a discernible effect on midtones and shadows. A fact that should keep some of these arts and crafts techniques at bay.

  8. #38
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    an overall flash typically kills any chance of a decent print contrast for me. i'd stay away from it.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #39

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    Thanks I tryed preflashing and it works great when you need it

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    that talk about using a small flashlight that is masked with a bit of neutral density filter (which could be nothing more than a bit of exposed and processed film leader) that you can use to flash specific highlight areas. I've tried that - it does work, but it's tricky to get the right amount of contrast reduction and avoid creating an obvious abnormal shadow.


    Well I have read about this technique... I will argue that this is impossible to do... If you think about it
    Bob I have a DauxLite II. It is a flash light like tool with a turret style cap on the front with varying size holes from 1mm to 5mm, it also has VC filters to add on. You choose the hole size and vc filter, after you finish exposing your print you swing in the red filter and turn your enlarger on so you can see what your doing and paint with light and I count out the seconds. A test print or two is all it usually takes. It works well with very small hot spots. I got mine years ago at B&H but I don't think they are being made anymore.

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