Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,549   Posts: 1,544,622   Online: 686
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,839
    Images
    108

    Effect of Dmax, Delta 100 have 4.5 , TriX have 3.5

    How Dmax analysis results effects the final photograph.

    I was a Crossfield 656 Drum Scanner operator and highest black was coming from Leica IIIC with Elmar 50mm and it was 3.5 , film was Kodak EPP. I scanned 8x10 US Ford Slides to anything and this was the highest in 4 years , year 1994-98.

    Was it the thing called DMax ?

    I visited DR5 and it says Delta have 4.5 , I remember Photo Engineer told about cine film copying film and was Dmax was 4.

    Can someone shed a light on Delta 100 films and I am very excited.

    Umut

  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,734
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    High D-Max caused by extra camera exposure will make printing times long.

    High D-Max caused by extra development steepens the characteristic curve which changes the relationship to the paper, a shorter range will straight print. Think Zone system "+" development or pushing.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,277
    Images
    12
    Why would you be very excited about Dmax for a negative? It's only really relevant for a display material, i.e. if you're using (as per DR5) the material for reversal.

    Otherwise, 3.5 is plenty of range and represents a lot more than what you can fit onto a print.

    And quit it with the Leicaphilia. Seriously, you know the camera doesn't affect the density of the negs, it's entirely down to exposure and processing.

  4. #4
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,532
    Images
    28
    Those are only the dMax numbers for the dr5 process.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,742
    Umut: D-max for a negative film is simply the maximum density (opacity) the developed metallic silver is capable of producing. A higher density means less light is transmitted. For papers it is the same thing (ie density of deposited silver) but is defined by reflection density since the print is viewed by reflected rather than transmitted light. So for negatives and transparencies, d-max results in the least amount of light transmission. For prints, d-max results in the least amount of light reflection ("maximum black").

  6. #6
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,026
    Images
    65
    Are you talking about the Dmax of negative or positive images?

    Are you accounting for the contrast and latitude if these are negatives?

    If they are positives, are they direct positives achieved by a reversal process, or are they made by a neg-pos printing process?

    These questions are critical in the answer to the OP.

    And then, are these figures from a densitometer or from a scanned image? If so, then nothing can be said!

    PE

  7. #7
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,653
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Seriously, you know the camera doesn't affect the density of the negs, it's entirely down to exposure and processing.
    When you have reversal material, the quality of the glass does impact the Dmax. More flare means lower Dmax. With negative material it would be Dmin that's affected.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  8. #8
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,734
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    When you have reversal material, the quality of the glass does impact the Dmax. More flare means lower Dmax. With negative material it would be Dmin that's affected.
    Actually flare does not change the D-max or D-min of the film or paper, those are determined physically/chemically.

    Flare does though change the qualities/usability of the image within that range.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #9
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,839
    Images
    108
    I am not expert. Lets talk about negative films and D76 development and scanning on a desktop scanner for APUG galleries.
    I have a Zeiss Ikon Nettar and I can buy Tri X or Delta 100. Film will be 120 class.

    I used Tri X, Plus X and Agfa Films past 20 years and with LTM.

    Do Delta 100 have a advantage over other films ? I have extremelly tight budget now and I buy 2 rolls in 3 months.

    Umut

  10. #10
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,219
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    I am not expert. Lets talk about negative films and D76 development and scanning on a desktop scanner for APUG galleries.
    I am not an expert on the galleries, but aren't the scans in APUG galleries supposed to be scans of analog prints?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin