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  1. #11

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    You could develop the film normally as you usually do and then use a reducer to correct the density. This has the advantage that you can see what you are doing during the reduction and stop at any time.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  2. #12
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    Pulling Ilford HP5 Plus 400 ISO film to 12 ISO. Possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    You could develop the film normally as you usually do and then use a reducer to correct the density. This has the advantage that you can see what you are doing during the reduction and stop at any time.
    What's a reducer? And you say you can see what you're doing? Is this after you use stop bath? Please educate me


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #13

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    A reducer is used to remove silver from a negative or print. For an over exposed negative you need a cutting reducer like Farmer's Reducer. After developing and fixing the negative wash it briefly and then immerse it in Farmer's reducer. The formula is readily available on many websites and consists of potassium ferricyanide and sodium thiosulfate. Watch the negative carefully to check when the density is approaching the desired level. Remove the negative from the bath. Rewash the negative for your usual time to remove any thiosulfate from the reducing bath. It is best to stop just before the negative reaches the desired density as reduction continues for a brief period during washing. This can all be done in room light.

    Kodak used to supply this reducer in small foil pouches for single use. An older photo store might still have it. You can buy the reducer ready to be mixed from Photographer's Formulary. You want their Reducer #1. This makes more stock solution than you need but it is handy to have and works on prints as well.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 12-15-2012 at 12:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rawhead View Post
    If it's critical stuff, shoot a different roll at that rate, test on that.
    This may be the most useful advice of all. You can test over and over again until you get exactly the results you want before processing the real negatives with absolutely no surprises.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  5. #15
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    Pulling Ilford HP5 Plus 400 ISO film to 12 ISO. Possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    A reducer is used to remove silver from a negative or print. For an over exposed negative you need a cutting reducer like Farmer's Reducer. After developing and fixing the negative wash it briefly and then immerse it in Farmer's reducer. The formula is readily available on many websites and consists of potassium ferricyanide and sodium thiosulfate. Watch the negative carefully to check when the density is approaching the desired level. Remove the negative from the bath and wash it briefly and then refix it in youy usual fixer. Rewash the negative for your usual time to remove any thiosulfate from the reducing bath. It is best to stop just before the negative reaches the desired density as reduction continues for a brief period during washing. This can all be done in room light.

    You can buy the reducer ready to be mixed from Photographer's Formulary. You want their Reducer #1.
    Oh wow! That's awesome!!

    How bad is the grain after that? (Obviously it fluctuates depending on amount of adjustment, but generally, like 25% more grain? 60%? Etc).

    Thanks!


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #16
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    Pulling Ilford HP5 Plus 400 ISO film to 12 ISO. Possible?

    Oh and is there an un-reducer? That somehow densifies under exposed images?


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #17

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    Yes they are called intensifiers. There is one catch you cannot add shadow detail where none exists in the original negative. However they allow you to get a good print without resorting to a higher contrast paper or filtration.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Oh wow! That's awesome!!

    How bad is the grain after that?
    The grain is reduced from what was in the original negative.

    If the negative has been dried it should be soaked in water for a few miutes before starting the reuction process to prevent uneven reduction.

    I would suggest that you practice a few times with scrap negatives until you get familiar with the reduction process.

    Before the invention of the light meter both reducers and intensifiers were retinely used by photographers since films were often undeer or over exposed.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 12-15-2012 at 12:46 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #19
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Pulling Ilford HP5 Plus 400 ISO film to 12 ISO. Possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Yes they are called intensifiers. There is one catch you cannot add shadow detail where none exists in the original negative. However they allow you to get a good print without resorting to a higher contrast paper or filtration.
    Hmm, sometimes contrast can look nice so man wish I knew about this... Yesterday... Hey can you do this step after everything is dry? (I hope you say no, doing individual cut images of 120 will be a HUGE pain....especially to dry properly...).


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  10. #20
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    Pulling Ilford HP5 Plus 400 ISO film to 12 ISO. Possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The grain is reduced from what was in the original negative.
    Sorry, last question... Is the acutince (sp?) also increased? (Made sharper).


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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