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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Fred, in some literature from the 40's & 50's Tri-X is called Tri-X Pan, given it's full nane of Tri-X Panchromatic, or just called Tr-X, but that's the same for Plus-X. Super-XX ect. The only film to change was Verichrome which had always been Orthochromatic from it's introduction in the early 1900's by Wratten & Wainwright, some products remaining in production after the became part of Kodak Ltd. It sold under the Kodak name from 1931 until 1956 when it was replaced by a Panchromatoc version - Verichrome Pan

    A fly in the ointment with Tri-X was in fact it varied depending on which plant made and coated the emulsion. I had (and may still have somewhere) Kodak developer data-sheets showing different recommended exposures and development times for films made in the US, Canada or the UK. This wouldn't be so important to the average photographer buying films in their local market but by the 1950's photojournalists where regularly flying to different locations and Tri-X had become a film of choice for many, so getting the processing right was important.

    I think it was the early to mid to 1970's before Tr-X became consistent/similar from every plant, this was matched by improvements in Kodkas Professional colour reversal films which no longer came with recommended speed ratings and colour filtration which had previously varied batch to batch.

    It is odd that Kodak themselves didn't clarify the 50th Anniversary of Tri-X in the link you posted, but then it's just basic key points and sketchy.

    Ian

  2. #12
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    I have the inclusion sheet that came with some Plus X in the mid 50s. (I think) It's a quick snap with a digital camera and the light was poor bit it's legible, just.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PanX_PX_SuperXX_a.jpg   PanX_PX_SuperXX_b.jpg  

  3. #13

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    Thanks for that bit of history, Ian. Interesting stuff. I always assumed Tri-X originated in the 50s.

  4. #14

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    Thanks, guys, for all the help! Interesting how different the exposure index/development instructions were back then. Ian, you are a veritable fountain of historical photographic information!

    Thanks, Murray, for the data sheet. Most helpful!
    Last edited by Fred Aspen; 12-17-2012 at 08:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    -Fred

  5. #15
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    I have made it a .pdf file for easier reading.
    Attached Files

  6. #16

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    I believe Tri-X was discontinued for a time in the late 40s or early 50s and then was reintroduced as an entirely new (and different) film in the mid 50s. That may not be true in all countries, however. There was a change in PX at around this time as well. Super-XX changed a bit over its life as well, but I don't remember any hype about it. The introduction of the new Tri-X was also about the time when Super-XX was discontinued in rolls, although it continued to be available in sheets for many years.

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    No, Tri-X was never discontinued it's in the Kodak Reference Databooks for 1946 (US), 1952/3, and Kodak UK publications during the same period.

    It's not in the Kodak adverts in my WWII era BJP Almanacs but then it's quite possible that all production went to the military, I know that in the UK very little film was available for amateur use during the war.

    Ian

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