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Thread: Tri-X vs. T-Max

  1. #91
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    Well, I didn't wrote 'better' or 'Technically better' or mentioned resolution, hence its hard to answer Your question.
    The OP asked about what Steve Anchell wrote about Tri-X and Tmax.. not what Tom Cruise or Brad Pitt think about Tri-X.
    Yes, exactly. Those were my words.

    I don't care what Steve Anchell says, is another way of putting it...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Yes, exactly. Those were my words.

    I don't care what Steve Anchell says, is another way of putting it...
    We are cool, no worries

  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It's all about the print, Mark. What else is there? Paper + developer has certain tonal characteristics, and if we don't learn how to work with our materials to fit those characteristics, then we miss a massive awful lot of potential. Trying to wrestle paper around negative characteristics is a huge compromise.

    Thank you for the kind words, by the way. I have a great deal of respect for you.
    It took me quite a while to wrap my head around "starting my thought at the print" and then working backwards though the systems to define my process, still in the midst of that process.

    Before I started printing wet myself I just didn't get it.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #94

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    Works for me too and it starts at the original scene. Imagine the desired outcome and think like the paper. That guides everything from camera filters to exposure, developer/development routine and on and on to the final print.

  5. #95

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    All film are exactly the same. Here's how you prove it: smear vaseline over your enlarger lens, make
    a print, crumple it up, then rephotograph it with your cell phone camera, then post it in a low res
    JPEQ for a 2 inch square web evaluation. Scientific objectivity perfected! Also helps if you smear
    vaseline over your own eyeballs.

  6. #96

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    I just did that test yesterday.

  7. #97
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    All film are exactly the same. Here's how you prove it: smear vaseline over your enlarger lens, make
    a print, crumple it up, then rephotograph it with your cell phone camera, then post it in a low res
    JPEQ for a 2 inch square web evaluation. Scientific objectivity perfected! Also helps if you smear
    vaseline over your own eyeballs.
    Nope, but it is possible to make TMax and Tri-X both fit Ilford MGIV / replenished LPD with highly similar print tonality as an outcome. No vaseline needed. Just some cheerful joy, and a little bit of practice.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    Read the 1st post and note that its a technical thread posted in Darkroom -> B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry....
    Crystallography, Chemistry and how Kodak tweaked (several times) a classic film like Tri-X is on topic.
    I didn't say anything was off topic, I'm just saying that the type of 400 iso film used has such a small effect on the final image as compared to other variables that it barely warrants a second thought. I think Steve Anchell's opinions on Tmax are unwarranted since the two films in question are more similar than they are different. Differences do exist, but unless you know what to look for you wouldn't notice. If there were big differences between the two, or other 400 iso films for that matter then we wouldn’t be having these discussions with such wildly varying opinions.

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    ... well, we now do have a testimonial that vaseline over the eyeballs works ...

  10. #100

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    Regardless, the toe with any of these is considerably
    less than with Tri-X, i.e., always higher contrast in the toe with either TMax film.
    I noticed the same in limited shooting with new T-Max 400. This characteristic, as a starting point for me, suggests I rate new -135 T-Max 400 at 320, use no light yellow filter, and gain speed for indoor portraits. Those small format images are likely to have a MF smooth look in 5x7 prints. I gain a stop on Tri-X and retain shadow contrast; at least I hope.
    RJ



 

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