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  1. #11
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Thie question of dark room and chemicals has been discussed in length on another thread. Under thee reducing conditions of a septic tank silver ions are converted to silver sulfide which is VERY insoluble so no silver gets into the evironment.
    Where it would presumably eventually settle out into the sludge at the bottom of the tank that is pumped out every 5-7 years for proper disposal? At least this is what I've read elsewhere.

    Ken
    "Hate is an adolescent term used to stop discussion with people you disagree with. You can do better than that."
    —'blanksy', December 13, 2013

  2. #12

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    For the small volume I've been doing where I have a septic tank, I empty depleted developer, the used fixer, and a first tank of wash water into a plastic jug. I have another place where I can discard it where it will be treated in a municipal treatment plant.

    Based on the research I did on APUG and other sites, I'm not concerned with putting a few rolls worth of developer a week into my septic tank, but would not put the used silver down the drain.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  3. #13
    DSLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi dlsr

    contact me if you are interested in a silver magnet or trickle tank ..
    i don't do the hard sell, so if you want one, great ... if not, whatever ... i'm not going to hound you or anything.
    Once I set up a proper darkroom I'd be very interested in that. Right now, I'm just developing film. Could you pm me with more info?

    For now I think I'm probably going to store my used chemicals in water bottles and the bring them to the municipal treatment center. Just to be on the safe side, I'll probably pour the wash in the bottle as well. i didn't realize there is a hazardous materials place down the street from where I live, so it won't be too much of a hassle.

    Thanks for all the replies,.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DSLR View Post
    Once I set up a proper darkroom I'd be very interested in that. Right now, I'm just developing film. Could you pm me with more info?

    For now I think I'm probably going to store my used chemicals in water bottles and the bring them to the municipal treatment center. Just to be on the safe side, I'll probably pour the wash in the bottle as well. i didn't realize there is a hazardous materials place down the street from where I live, so it won't be too much of a hassle.

    Thanks for all the replies,.
    you might also look for schools or mini labs that might have a recycling plan in place
    they might not mind you just adding to their take-out ..

    good luck !
    john

  5. #15
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    I would agree with anyone that has said, DON'T.. DO NOT dump ANY of your photo waste in your septic, period.
    Go to a darkroom that is hooked to a sewer line. ..

  6. #16

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    Kodak in one of its publications states that there is no adverse effect on septic systems from the amateur darkroom. The professional darkroom is another matter.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17
    DSLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Kodak in one of its publications states that there is no adverse effect on septic systems from the amateur darkroom. The professional darkroom is another matter.
    Really? Which publication?

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Kodak in one of its publications states that there is no adverse effect on septic systems from the amateur darkroom. The professional darkroom is another matter.
    Gerald:

    I'm afraid Kodak's publications no longer make this statement.

    Darkroom Design for Amateur Photographers • AK-3 explicitly states the opposite: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/ak3/ak3.pdf

    Environmental Guidelines for Amateur Photographers • J-300 is the best Kodak reference I can find on the subject: http://www.kodak.de/ek/uploadedFiles...er/J300ENG.pdf

    That being said, I don't think the trace amounts the OP was asking about (in the rinse and wash solutions) are of concern.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
    RPC
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSLR View Post
    I'm going to develop a roll of 120 tomorrow and have a few questions. When I'm doing the stop bath (with water) is it OK to let that little bit of developer (Hc110) go down the drain? Same with the fixer, after I pour the used stuff back in the bottle is it alright to let the little amount still on the film rinse down the drain? I'm going to pour the used developer into an empty water bottle and will discard the fixer properly as well. I have a septic tank so that's why I'm worried.
    Septic systems work in part by the soil filtering the effluent so by the time it gets to the groundwater it is fit enough to drink. If this didn't happen, there would be contaminated groundwater everywhere. Think of all the things people pour down their drains--soaps, detergents, household cleaning chemicals, and who knows what else. So I doubt if you need to worry about any harm to the environment. To reiterate what has been said before on this site, the only problem might be silver or silver compounds interfering with bacterial action that breaks down solid wastes. But again the small amount a typical home darkroom worker uses would likely not pose a problem compared to a big lab. I have been pouring all my chemistry down the drain for years and when my tank has been pumped I have never been told of any problems, nor have I heard of any cases where it has happened.

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    one way to reduce the amount of chemicals used is to switch from inversion to rotary processing!This helps your walletand your septic tank or environment.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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