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  1. #1
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
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    usersof this medium as per art photography: CXS Ortho Green Film by Agfa

    hello--

    Any information--or direction to posts/links--on the subject of using x-ray film for art photography would be gratefully received.

    Specifically: once exposed, making contact prints (the mechanics of how one would go about it--never having tried it), building a LF 'box' to hold the individual sheets, etc. Possibly a relatively inexpensive entrée into the next logical step up as a photographer...

    On first analysis, it appears to be doable--and, e.g., not terribly expensive for a fairly large 'light-canvas'...

    also (almost as an afterthought--pardon the digression): it would seem that this medium might be a good stopgap--vis-à-vis the chronic anxiety of film's imminent demise. That is, radiologists and the medical community will look to hard-copy 'documents' of pathology testing for their own archives...

    http://is.gd/JENIDQ

    Best,

    Dean

  2. #2
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Dean,
    Xray film is much like any other analog photographic material in that is being replaced in the working world with digital versions. The need for electronically sharable medical files is increasing the rate at which this is happening. Still, while it lasts it's a good, inexpensive way to play around with large format. A lot has been written in this forum about using Xray film, and I would suggest a search for threads on the subject would be more useful than anything I could tell you here. Contact printing is pretty straightforward, given a dark room, a controllable light source, some way to keep the negative and receiver in contact (plate glass works well) and the chemistry to process the paper–an enlarger is not your only choice here, but the options are, again, too broad to review in one post.

    Paper negatives are also something you might want to try. Good luck.

  3. #3
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Taylor View Post
    also (almost as an afterthought--pardon the digression): it would seem that this medium might be a good stopgap--vis-à-vis the chronic anxiety of film's imminent demise. That is, radiologists and the medical community will look to hard-copy 'documents' of pathology testing for their own archives...
    Halide film for X-ray capture has already left great parts of the medical world. And hardcopies are made on different materials now.
    Last edited by AgX; 12-18-2012 at 07:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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