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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    We hare losing money out of all paper products. The exact quote as far as I can make it was posted at tht time.

    PE

  2. #12
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    PE that conversation was when ? 2006 ?
    If I had known theses papers in France in the 80's... I (and a lot of people) would have used them...

  3. #13
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    Mon Ami

    You were too busy watching Dean and Jerry reruns.

    Ectalure G was my favourite paper along side Ilford Ilformar which if Simon is lurking ... make our day.. please Simon pretty please

    I have some Kodak Elite which is really beautiful for Lith my friend if you can get some. If not I will give you what I can find, I do not have much
    but its yours, I will ship it inside the portfolio crate along with some other tasty papers for you to try .
    I am not into that pretty lith thing anymore, making some multiple layer prints.. last real long, combines digital and analoque, love it.

    Bob


    Quote Originally Posted by Guillaume Zuili View Post
    PE that conversation was when ? 2006 ?
    If I had known theses papers in France in the 80's... I (and a lot of people) would have used them...

  4. #14

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    For a while some people like Adams and other West Coasters thought the Kodak papers available throughout the 50s-60s were generally below par. I remember something about correspondance between Adams and Kodak on this. He told Kodak there was no excuse for a company like that not offering better papers. So at the time, I don't know, maybe this is why so many people liked Oriental and Agfa better. Who knows.

    I came along too late for Kodabromide, Medalist etc. But I can say the late Elite Fine Art was wonderful. And the most recent version of Polymax Fine Art was my favourite paper for years up until they quit papers altogether and I switched to Ilford.

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    We hare losing money out of all paper products. The exact quote as far as I can make it was posted at tht time.

    PE
    Gee, if they stopped paying his salary, they would be loosing less money!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I'm finding what you're finding too, Guillaume. Most of my lith paper Kodak stock is Kodabromide and Ektalure G, K, Y. There isn't much left, but I love printing on it. Some of those papers are still good for regular printing too, particularly a box of Ektalure G that I use once in a while. Beautiful paper!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #17
    jp498's Avatar
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    My only kodak paper experience was with their polycontrast-rc paper with Kodak written on the back. I didn't think it did anything special compared to Ilford, so I mostly bought Ilford and was happy with it. No big loss as far as I was concerned. Never used the ancient Kodak papers.

  8. #18

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    Dear All,

    KODAK monochrome papers of all types, like all KODAK products were absolutely superb products, made with great technical skill by very gifted people, but in the UK and Europe in the 90's KODAK mono paper was hardly seen unless it was a roll up deal with colour in a lab, simply put AGFA and ILFORD just squeezed KODAK out, also to be really focussed on a product range helps I had only monochrome in my bag to sell, KODAK reps had lots of things to sell, especially colour!. The big change to KODAK was when we ( ILFORD as was ) overtook sales of KODAK monochrome paper products in the USA in the mid 90's.... that was a really big deal for us.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  9. #19
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There was another issue in the UK, Kodak kept changing their papers in the 70's & 80's and there was no consistency, Ilford & Agfa papers on the other hand seemed to evolve more smoothly.

    When I started printing in the 1960's Kodak papers were easy to find but that changed to the point Simon mentions, the 1990's, it was rare to see Kodak B&W on dealers shelves. Plenty of Ilford and kentmere, but Agfa disapperaed for a while and was only imported independently by Peter Goldfied and sold through his shop Goldfinger.

    Even Kodak emplyees used to say that Ilford B&Wpapers were superior to their own.

    Ian

  10. #20
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The pollution laws in the US and the variations from state to state began to be felt in the early '60s. By the time I joined EK in 1965, the full effect was underway causing removal of Cadmium, Lead and Mercury from all products. These three metals gave some of the papers their unique tone and curve shape. It took a while to overcome these changes. In addition, there were some old timers who refused to budge and wanted to keep the old emulsions for quality purposes. There was a very severe political struggle over this but the new emulsions won out.

    I worked on the new emulsions and we had to develop a series of organic compounds that would give us the proper curve shape, and do it with good keeping and give the same results over a broad range of process temps (20C to 40C). This was a long and laborious job. I might add that the gutting of the R&D B&W division in about 1988 didn't help.

    During this time, the range of products varied (as did some of the products), and after this, Kodak tried to break into the SA market by building a paper plant in Brazil.

    Then in about 2005, the same year that Ilford had difficulties and Agfa went bankrupt, Kodak exited the paper market. It was that time that I spoke to Perez at a luncheon. He answered my question from the podium and walked right up to me with the mike. He had a very serious and sincere tone when he answered me. Bob Shanebrook was there at another table. He made some comment to me after the lunch about this.

    At about this same time, Kodak experienced a 30% drop in sales in one quarter. This drop affected the entire photo business.

    PE

    PE

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