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  1. #31
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    The mfg. instructions say that a stop bath is not necessary and, in fact, recommend against it.

    Therefore, instead of Dev. > Stop > Fix > Wash, it becomes Dev.-A > Dev.-B > Fix > Wash. The same number of steps. You just trade Dev.-B for the Stop.

    They also recommend a rinse between Stop and Fix but I do that already. It prolongs the life of the fixer. Right?

    Bottom line: No more work than other workflows.
    They do recommend a water rinse between bath B and fix, though. I've always done this. In fact, after some problems with pinholes in Foma, I'm going to that for all my film. An acid stop is not necessary for most developers anyway.

    It's one more bath, but it's so easy it really turns out simpler. Really. About the only thing really bad I can say about it is that it's pretty expensive to try if you don't know you'll like it. But if you do like it, it lasts so long it's very inexpensive to actually use.

  2. #32

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    (using Diafine twice for more speed)

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    Yup, it's been done. I can't remember who did this, but a longtime APUGer posted this trick here. I think he go EI 6400 from TX by doing this. If you search the archives, you may find it.
    I think it was Donald Qualls, who also cooked up a developer that gets a very respectable 6400 and an arguably-usable 12800 from HP5+ or TX400. He seems to have wandered away from APUG in the last few years, which is a shame as he contributed some very good mad-scientist darkroom ideas.

    I never tried this particular trick myself, but clearly you'd have to rinse the holy hell out of it after the first B bath to avoid any contamination of the A bath. If you only needed to do it once in a blue moon, I suppose you could throw away the second A bath rather than putting it back in the stock bottle. Even then, it seems like the emulsion wouldn't absorb too much of the A bath due to being already wet---might it work even better to let it *dry* in the tank, at least partially, before doing the second round?

    The approach makes sense, but of course you'd lose a certain amount of the compensating effect in the highlights. Reduced agitation might bring back some of that compensation, I guess, but maybe at the cost of unevenness. IMHO, some experiments are justified to find out what does and doesn't work well in practice.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
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    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #33
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I haven't used Diafine in decades, and when I did, it was while developing film for others.

    What sort of results might I expect if I used it for T-Max 100?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #34

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    Re: Is Diafine really that easy to use?

    How sensitive is the agitation scheme? Can it be used in a jobo processor?

    Stefan

    Verstuurd van mijn GT-P7510 met Tapatalk

  5. #35
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Is Diafine really that easy to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by gliderbee View Post
    How sensitive is the agitation scheme? Can it be used in a jobo processor?

    Stefan

    Verstuurd van mijn GT-P7510 met Tapatalk
    Someone on the large format forum was talking about trying it but I don't recall any results posted. I have a Jpbo I use with conventional developers but just use the 1500 series tanks and inversion (I have both lids) with Diafine.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    So it ripens huh? Interesting, is that the B developer that ripens or the A?

    Also does this mean IN THEORY that if you took it and soaked in A... The. Developed in B till completion... Then soaked in A again and back to B, you could push it beyond the normal point as more developer could soak in?

    Sounds to me like more of a pain, I already dislike multiple steps without adding a 4th... Lol
    You don't want to contaminate bath A with bath B (don't cross the streams!). So you really can't try that unless you want to use it as a one shot developer.

    I give the tank a good tap after filling it to dislodge air bubbles. After that I invert once and slowly at the halfway mark.

    I have had bromide (?) drag marks with the plastic reels, but never encountered that problem with the stainless type.
    Last edited by Harry Lime; 12-26-2012 at 10:20 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #37
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I've always used it with plastic reels and never had a problem. Why are you inverting only once half way through? Instructions say to agitate gently for 10 seconds (three inversions or so if done slowly) initially followed by 5 seconds each minute - which is what I do, two gentle inversions and tap the tank each minute including the last one, then pour. Never any problems with unevenness.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Lime View Post
    With Tri-X you get very good classic looking results....

    ...Once it has 'ripened' a little your negatives will become noticeably smoother and take on a pearly appearance.
    Those are, pretty much, the results I'm looking for. If I get my exposure and development just right I have been able to get that with D-76 and XTOL but I just can't do it every time.

    Neopan 100, Neopan 400, Pan F+ and Tri-X are my films of choice. As I have read and, as you all have said, those are the films that work best in Diafine.

    I often increase or decrease my exposure by a little bit to catch the shadows or the highlights. Just, sometimes, I have trouble getting exactly what I want.
    I like to shoot outdoors on sunny days or bright, hazy days. I'll shoot indoors if there is enough light. Sometimes, I'll shoot using a sunny window for light but, mostly I like that global light that you get outdoors. I usually prefer mid to bright contrast levels.

    It seems to me that Diafine is a good match for the films I shoot, the way I shoot them and the look I want. I have no illusion that Diafine will be some sort of a silver bullet but it's worth a try. Right?

    I like experimenting and trying new things. As I see it, Diafine is a good thing for me to try.
    Cross my fingers and, if I get some good stuff, I'll post.

    Thanks for the advice!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #39
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    If you like experimenting and trying new things, that's reason enough to try Diafine. Unless you've used other true two bath developers, it's unlike anything you've used.

    FP4+ also works well, EI 200 or so. Not as much effective speed as Plus-X which worked great in it - the box suggested 400 for Plus-X but I actually thought that was a bit too slow and often went to 500, at least with old style Plus-X I used in Diafine in the 80s. But FP4+ looks fine. So did Agfapan 100 (EI 320 or so IIRC.)

  10. #40
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    Is Diafine really that easy to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    The mfg. instructions say that a stop bath is not necessary and, in fact, recommend against it.

    Therefore, instead of Dev. > Stop > Fix > Wash, it becomes Dev.-A > Dev.-B > Fix > Wash. The same number of steps. You just trade Dev.-B for the Stop.

    They also recommend a rinse between Stop and Fix but I do that already. It prolongs the life of the fixer. Right?

    Bottom line: No more work than other workflows.
    Oh gotcha.

    And yes I alway wash between steps to prolong the fixer.


    ~Stone

    The Noteworthy Ones - Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1 / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic

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    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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