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  1. #21
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    Great tips guys.. Murphy's law.. this negative has a beautiful image on it and accidently touched it and put a slight finger print on it and this happened. I'll try it tonight keep you posted.This is first time this has happened too. I have a filter system installed to help.

    Todd
    Clean the neg with a cotton swab moistened with 91% isopropyl alcohol.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  2. #22
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    I learned to keep a Tupperware (or similar) container full of distilled water. After a batch of negatives is washed in water, I put a capful of isopropyl alcohol and 1 drop of Photo Flo in the water, stir, and rinse the negs before hanging to dry. No water spots, few dust spots as long as I get out of the darkroom and let the film dry. I reuse the same water over and over again, adding new alcohol and Photo Flo each time. The alcohol helps the water evaporate from the film more quickly, and I think also keeps mutant life forms from growing in the Photo-Flo enriched water.
    I use a similar method. I use one drop of Edwal LFN per 16oz distilled water plus one capfull of 91% isopropyl alcohol. I never get spots on my film and it dries in minutes. I still allow overnight drying, or at least a few hours, for the emulsion to harden properly to avoid scratching.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #23

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    Can some one tell me that Photo-flo recipe shakes out in lamens terms? Meaning oz of water to Photo-flo.

    Todd

  4. #24
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Water spots on film?

    There's no recipe, really, Todd. The bottle says to dilute 1:200, but many of us find that to be too much. I use about two drops of Photo-Flo per reel of film in the developing tank.

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    Can some one tell me that Photo-flo recipe shakes out in lamens terms? Meaning oz of water to Photo-flo.

    Todd
    Lets say you normally use 20 ounces of working solution. That is equivalent to about 640 ml.

    So that means about 1/10 ounce of concentrate (3 ml) diluted to 20 ounces (640 ml).

    In order to "calibrate" your dispensing system, take an eye-dropper or bottle with a drop dispenser and use it to count how many drops of the Photo-flo are needed to dispense 1 ounce (32 ml). If the answer is 30, you know that you need 3 drops to dispense 1/10 ounce (3 ml).

    You can pour the 1 ounce back into the initial bottle.

    Like many here, I find 1:200 to be more concentrated than necessary, so I would suggest that if your calibration suggests 3 drops per 200 ml, start with 2 drops first.

    Be sure to mix it well - I like to put the concentrate into a small amount of water, and then dilute it to my target volume.

    There are two further things I've found helpful.

    1) A small (4 ounce?) bottle with an eye dropper incorporated in a re-closable cap is very handy - just dispense the Photo-flo concentrate into that first. Remember that you will have to calibrate it as well, as the dropper may dispense larger or smaller drops; or
    2) Consider making up a "stock" solution of Photo-flo in alcohol.

    For the last couple of years, I have been doing the latter. I have an 8 ounce (250 ml) bottle that I use to mix up a stock solution of 25 ml Photo-flo stock diluted with 70% isopropryl alcohol to 250 ml. For use, I further dilute that stock solution to a working solution by adding 23 parts water to one part stock (usually 25 ml diluted to 600 ml working). This means I end up with a total dilution of about 1:240, which works well with our water.

    It is much easier to measure 25 ml reasonably accurately than it is to measure the concentrate in drops. The alcohol in the stock solution prevents the growth of mould.

    Hope this helps.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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