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  1. #11
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    I haven't read their data sheets, but I get halation from the 400 in 35mm. Whether the film lacks an anti-halation layer or it is poor doesn't matter. I like the film anyway, just like Thomas, because of the halation, and the spectral response that favors reds.

  2. #12

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    Anyway, I've sent an email to Dana Hoja, Foma Bohemia and FomaFoto.
    Let's see if they care about the customer this time...

  3. #13
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    For 35 mm the gray tint of the layer has quite good antihalation properties itself, same principle as with the Kentmere films, but imo slightly better. It doesn't matter mostly and a halation effect can be seen maybe around strong lights, especially with night shots.

    Because of the extreme high yellow-red sensitivity (see data sheet) of the Foma films you may notice highlight burning especially with portraits. This effect is different from halation. Although high red sensitivity reduces skin irritations the film makes a very pale skin. That can be what you want, but that's why I don't like the Fomas for portraits. Even a superpan film like Technical Pan makes much nicer skin tones imo, the colour range is extended but does not increase in red sensitivity. For landscape I like the Fomas.

    Best - Reinhold

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by grommi View Post
    For 35 mm the gray tint of the layer has quite good antihalation properties itself, same principle as with the Kentmere films, but imo slightly better. It doesn't matter mostly and a halation effect can be seen maybe around strong lights, especially with night shots.

    Because of the extreme high yellow-red sensitivity (see data sheet) of the Foma films you may notice highlight burning especially with portraits. This effect is different from halation. Although high red sensitivity reduces skin irritations the film makes a very pale skin. That can be what you want, but that's why I don't like the Fomas for portraits. Even a superpan film like Technical Pan makes much nicer skin tones imo, the colour range is extended but does not increase in red sensitivity. For landscape I like the Fomas.

    Best - Reinhold
    I think whether a film is good for portraiture or not is a matter of taste. Check out post #49 in this thread:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum172/...n-200-a-3.html

    Sander's results are pretty interesting, I think, and the highlight intensity is used to create really wonderful tonality that makes the picture radiate.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    grommi's Avatar
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    Hi Thomas,

    yes, Sanders is a master and I observe his work regulary on flickr with big interest. The picture of Melanie you mentioned above really shows what is so special with Fomapan films and portraits. So scarse before blowing. Imagine a cloudy day outdoor and you probably will get flat pale faces. A master like Sanders can handle that and create a great photo. Of course it's a matter of taste. That's why I used the verbs "can, may, want, like".

    Best - Reinhold

  6. #16
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grommi View Post
    Hi Thomas,

    yes, Sanders is a master and I observe his work regulary on flickr with big interest. The picture of Melanie you mentioned above really shows what is so special with Fomapan films and portraits. So scarse before blowing. Imagine a cloudy day outdoor and you probably will get flat pale faces. A master like Sanders can handle that and create a great photo. Of course it's a matter of taste. That's why I used the verbs "can, may, want, like".

    Best - Reinhold
    Either that or he knows to shoot in good light.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #17

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  8. #18

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    For the sake of completeness I've received a reply from Slavomir Polivka of Fomafoto.com (whom I thank very much).
    It states: "Fomapan 100ASA 35mm has special colored blue-gray backing to eliminate halation. Its not the same as anti-halation backing of 120 and sheet film."

    So the pdf has no typo: Fomapan 100 classic has NO anti-halation backing and relies completely on the base colour to eliminate halation.

  9. #19
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Typically 35mm film has not got an anti-curling backlayer, which often contains an anti-halo function. But in this case the AH-layer could be placed on top of the substratum under the emulsion. The optimum location anyway.
    So it seems Foma did not do the latter.

  10. #20

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    I'd like like to point out that Mr. Polivka received the reply direcly from the factory.

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