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  1. #11
    piu58's Avatar
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    Most of such effects are not in the negative. They are made in the darkroom and can be made from quite ordinary shots. For such images the use of a harder grade of paper is necessary. This leads to differences in the overall image brightness at different parts of your shot which must equalized first (by burning and dodging). Using normal or soft grade, such problems are much less obvious. Then you add the "dramatic", again with burning and dodging, often with shields cut for this single image.
    You need much time in the darkroom to learn this.
    Your example got much more light in the cupper corners and at the bottom. Possibly the center part is dodged. If you try such manipulation using soft grade of paper the image gets muddy. If you use harder grade you have much more problems with the overall brightness (macro contrast). But this is manageable at least.
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    Uwe Pilz

  2. #12
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    "Fine Art" style of exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by Pandysloo View Post
    I'm completely new to B&W film. I would like to get into the "fine art" style; dramatic contrast: Attachment 61830

    I realize lighting is the biggest factor, but I also am not trying for a technically perfect exposure, meaning I don't want as much tonal detail as possible because that leads to a flatter image (from what I can tell).

    I have some Pan F+ and some Acros 100. Do I need to push it in order to get this look?
    Where did you find this example? Have you tried to ask the photographer?

    Are you sure it's even a film image and not a digital one?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #13

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    I think it is very easy to see how the OP's example image was made. It is an essentially straight exposure, nothing special, and some burning around the edges has been done in the darkroom. But it doesn't matter whether it was done after scanning, the same applies.

    Obviously choices about the initial contrast range have to be made, to get the definition in the swirling mist. But it is all post processing one way or another, the photographer has seen the end result in his minds eye, perhaps seen what is possible from the initial exposure and developed the film to give himself the best chance, but that is all. Everything else in this image seems to have been done with dodging and burning. This is one of the most basic darkroom techniques, and which can (I would say should) be applied to every image, if nothing else just to balance the edges of the print against the white paper.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

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  4. #14
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    I agree that some burning was probably used to finish the print Steve, but there are a variety of ways to get that type of print that can produce a better result than a bunch of after the fact burning.

    The swirling mist against the dark sky for example it is hard, really hard, to burn the sky without burning the clouds some too.

    Camera exposure placement is one, a camera filter possibly, print exposure placement choices surely, maybe negative masking...

    The thing I'd look for though, if I were going to try and recreate this particular look would be a bright moonlit night. From that lighting condition it might even be possible to print straight, no burn at all.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    MDR
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    An already dark background and higher paper grade or constrast setting plus the white mist lit by sunlight (is a natural effect no special printing etc. necessary) created this image. Photography is about light this Picture is a good example what the right light can do.

    But the best way to get an answer would be to ask Hengki Koentjoro how he did it.

    Dominik

  6. #16
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    well said.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    a perfect print starts with a perfect negativ,perfect exposure, followed by perfect development and a lot of love and care during printingand spotting.good luckand a ton of patience.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    I agree that some burning was probably used to finish the print Steve, but there are a variety of ways to get that type of print that can produce a better result than a bunch of after the fact burning.

    The swirling mist against the dark sky for example it is hard, really hard, to burn the sky without burning the clouds some too.

    Camera exposure placement is one, a camera filter possibly, print exposure placement choices surely, maybe negative masking...
    But the sky isn't dark, there isn't any sky, the image is shooting down onto the rainforest, you can see the trees in the background, so all the photographer had to do was make the mist stand out and burn.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
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    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    But the sky isn't dark, there isn't any sky, the image is shooting down onto the rainforest, you can see the trees in the background, so all the photographer had to do was make the mist stand out and burn.

    Steve
    What's the blank area above the trees?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #20

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    As others have said, in general, learn the process and materials, then control the image as you want (your vision will improve as you travel up the learning curve).
    And don't be impatient about making art - you have plenty of time, unless you are in your 80's.

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