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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    What's the blank area above the trees?
    Assuming you don't mean the steam/mist there is a marginally lighter area top right that I think is a cliff face/slope, but it is still possible to see detail in it as something to do with the Earth.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

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    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  2. #22

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    Here we are

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	8168360891_5e2cb19dd4v11.jpg 
Views:	86 
Size:	101.2 KB 
ID:	61841

    we can see they are all trees now. Click for larger view.

    Steve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 8168360891_5e2cb19dd4v11.jpg  
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  3. #23

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    "Fine Art" style of exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    Here we are

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	8168360891_5e2cb19dd4v11.jpg 
Views:	86 
Size:	101.2 KB 
ID:	61841

    we can see they are all trees now. Click for larger view.

    Steve
    Wow I like that better actually, did you find the photo and digitally alter it or find a different version?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #24
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    If the OP is interested in learning more about the creation of dramatic B&W images like that presented, he might want to check out John Sexton's Listen to the Trees. I believe that is the book with the useful technical information on John's technique. Oh, yes, look at the pictures in the book also!

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    Assuming you don't mean the steam/mist there is a marginally lighter area top right that I think is a cliff face/slope, but it is still possible to see detail in it as something to do with the Earth.

    Steve
    Fair enough. In the original on my screen it was dark enough that I didn't see any detail there.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #26

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    Practice helps. You need to be able to read the light to tell when such a shot is possible. Notice that the example is pretty much back lit, which is common for such dramatic contrast. If you have important foreground detail, you will usually need carefully controlled fill light. Learning to use your light meter in back lit conditions is also essential. Learning the Zone system, how to previsualize the print, how to assign exposure zones to the subject, and how to develop for a usable result (adjusting for the exposure) are also handy. Since such exposures often require development adjustment away from what is the average on a roll, sheet film can be handy. It all comes in time, and with more than a little luck. Your luck is more or less proportional to the number of days you get out and do some serious shooting.

  7. #27
    Pandysloo's Avatar
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    Thanks for your advice, everyone. I realize it is something that will take years of careful attention and patience, and while my post came off a bit eager, I was simply trying to figure out the right direction to go in order to some day arrive there. The lack of shortcuts is one thing I love about film so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by andrew.roos View Post
    Oh, and don't underexpose unless you like grain and muddy shadows, or intend to print the shadows as solid black.
    Everyone has been telling me to overexpose, but from what I can tell it looks washed out. For instance, in this photo I used an iPhone light meter app (I realize it's crude, but it's all I have at the moment) and set the EV compensation to 2 stops under. I then metered off the sky, which should have underexposed the image even more, if I'm not mistaken. Upon scanning it (unaltered), the image was still too bright for my tastes, and I had to drop the brightness maybe 1 stop-worth to get it looking like this: http://geometryofthought.tumblr.com/image/34321301137

    My understanding up until this point was to underexpose the negative to get dramatic contrast, then print without altering it. It seems my concept of the photographic process was wrong. So the negative is for capturing the most tonal information, with adjustments to be made in the darkroom, correct? Rather than doing everything "in camera," so to speak...

    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Where did you find this example? Have you tried to ask the photographer?

    Are you sure it's even a film image and not a digital one?
    The photographer is Hengki Koentjoro, who shoots with a Hasselblad. I have not tried to ask him; it's always the simplest and most direct solutions we seem to overlook, eh?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pandysloo View Post
    I'm completely new to B&W film. I would like to get into the "fine art" style; dramatic contrast: Attachment 61830

    I realize lighting is the biggest factor, but I also am not trying for a technically perfect exposure, meaning I don't want as much tonal detail as possible because that leads to a flatter image (from what I can tell).

    I have some Pan F+ and some Acros 100. Do I need to push it in order to get this look?
    If you are completely new to B&W film and would like to get into the "fine art" style; dramatic contrast, may I suggest you spend a few years just working with B&W and you may realise that lighting is not the biggest factor.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #29

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    anything made by a hassleblad looks like this

  10. #30
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    anything made by a hassleblad looks like this
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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